Summer Exhibition 2024

Emil Nolde, Tränende Herzen und Tulpen
Stiftung Nolde Seebüll
‘I loved the blooming colours of the flowers and the purity of these colours. I loved the flowers in their fate: shooting up, blossoming, shining, glowing, blissful, bending, withering, discarded, ending in the pit. Our human destiny is not always as logical and beautiful, but it also always ends in fire or in the pit.’


Dear collectors, artists, art lovers, dear friends,

May 2024 brings a lot of colour, inspiration and joy to my little house in Riehen thanks to the support of old, loyal and unselfish friends. Works of the highest quality and best provenance, many of them little gems, just like my workplace. I feel a deep, warm sense of gratitude and am happy that I probably didn't do everything wrong in my previous working life when I unconditionally and transparently placed humanity, love and respect for the work of the creators and the people who care for this work at the forefront of my work.

More than half a year has now passed since the opening of my gallery in Riehen, opposite the Fondation Beyeler. Every single day has been exciting and characterised by meeting many new people from all over the world. Time flies by like a rush.

The location means that I have to deal with an unaccustomed number of visitors; there are days when I welcome more visitors here than I was able to do in three months at the previous gallery. Not a single negative experience, no derogatory or unfair comments, it's nothing short of a miracle.

If our crazy world could now also find some peace, if people could dare to give themselves something beautiful and inspiring again, if everyday life could be characterised by fewer fears, doubts and insecurities, I would also be completely relaxed about the future for all of us.

I will be opening the 2024 summer exhibition at the beginning of June, celebrating more of my ‘heroes’.

Pinocchio
1981 - 1981
Artists
Siegfried Anzinger
Mischtechnik auf Papier
CHF 7,500.00
Signature
Unten rechts zwei Mal signiert und datiert
81 x 50 cm
Enquiry
Idyll
1999 - 1999
Artists
Georg Baselitz
Radierung und Aquaforte auf Bütten (Etching and aquaforte on laid paper)
CHF 4,500.00
Edition
12/15
Signature
Signiert und nummeriert (Signed and numbered)
86 x 63 cm
Enquiry
Ohne Titel
1991 - 1991
Artists
Georg Baselitz
Radierung, Kaltnadel auf Bütten
CHF 4,500.00
Edition
17/30
Signature
Unten rechts signiert und datiert, unten rechts nummeriert
76 x 56 cm
Enquiry
Das letze Bildnis der Meret Oppenheim XVIII (the last Portrait of Meret Oppenheim XVIII)
Description
Jürgen Brodwolf has explored the artist Meret Oppenheim, or rather her portrait, in a series of groups of works including drawings, book objects and an installation. This engagement lasted with interruptions from 1985, the year of Meret Oppenheim's death, until 1996. The death sheets for M.O. (Meret Oppenheim) emerge as a closed cycle. They are not a consciously conceived homage, memorial sheets after death, rather the designation was made retrospectively: the sheets gain specific meaning beyond the play of design by reflexively linking certain forms with memory and consciousness
2013 - 2013
Artists
Jürgen Brodwolf
Acrylfarbe, Collage, Tubenfigur, Wachs (Monotypie (Kopf)) auf Papier, (mixed media on paper)
CHF 3,700.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Unten signiert und datiert sowie betitelt - verso signiert, datiert, betitelt (signed and dated on the lower edge, titled on the lower edge and titled, signed, dated on the verso)
37 x 31 cm
Enquiry
Piratin Fu
1985
Artists
Luciano Castelli
Öl auf Leinwand
CHF 56,000.00
Edition
Unikat
80 x 100 cm
Enquiry
Mozart mit Kerze Selbstportrait,
1985
Artists
Luciano Castelli
Öl auf Leinwand
CHF 54,000.00
Edition
Unikat
100 x 80 cm
Enquiry
Piratin Fu
Description
Luciano Castelli, Berlin.
1985
Artists
Luciano Castelli
Öl auf Leinwand
CHF 54,000.00
Edition
Unikat
100 x 80 cm
Enquiry
Senza Rete (Without Net)
1988 - 1988
Artists
Bruno Ceccobelli
Holz, Wachs, Ölfarbe (wood, wax, oil)
CHF 36,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Verso signiert datiert, betitelt (signed, dated and titled on the verso)
120 x 210 x 10 cm
Enquiry
In Vetta dono
1991 - 1991
Artists
Bruno Ceccobelli
Mischtechnik auf Holz (mixed media on wood)
CHF 26,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Verso signiert datiert, betitelt (signed, dated titled on the verso)
127 x 90 x 10 cm
Enquiry
Josué devant Jéricho
Description
MARC CHAGALL



Witebsk 1887 - 1985 Vence



Josué devant Jéricho. Blatt 46 aus der Folge „La Bible“. In Gelb und Violett aquarellierte Radierung, 1931-1956/58.

Sorlier-Vollard 244. Aus Cramer Bücher 30. - Expl. 84/100. Monogrammiert sowie mit dem Namenszug in der Platte. Auf kräftigem chamoisfarbenem Vélin d’Arches. 33 x 22,6 cm (Blatt: 53,5 x 39 cm).
1931 - 1956/58
Artists
Marc Chagall
In Gelb und Violett aquarellierte Radierung auf kräftigem chamoisfarbenem Vélin d’Arches
CHF 18,000.00
Edition
84/100
Signature
Monogrammiert sowie mit dem Namenszug (unten rechts) in der Platte.
33 x 22,6 cm (Blatt: 53,5 x 39 cm)
Enquiry
Moïse et le Serpent.
Description
MARC CHAGALL



Witebsk 1887 - 1985 Vence



Moïse et le Serpent. Blatt 30 aus der Folge „La Bible“. In Grün, Gelb, Rosé und Blau aquarellierte Radierung, 1931-1956/58.

Sorlier-Vollard 226. Aus Cramer Bücher 30. - Expl. 7/100. Monogrammiert sowie mit dem Namenszug (unten rechts) in der Platte. Auf kräftigem chamoisfarbenem Vélin d’Arches. 29,5 x 23 cm (Blatt: 53,5 x 39 cm). Breite Ränder schwach gebräunt und Unterrand mit schwachen Farbspuren. Die bereits 1956 erschienene Folge von 105 in der Zeit von 1931-56 entstandenen Bibel-Radierungen wurde 1958 in einer 100er Auflage von Chagall aquarelliert.



The Staff of Moses, also known as the Staff of God is a staff mentioned in the Bible and Quran as a walking stick used by Moses. According to the Book of Exodus, the staff (Hebrew: מַטֶּה matteh, translated "rod" in the King James Bible) was used to produce water from a rock, was transformed into a snake and back, and was used at the parting of the Red Sea.[1] Whether the staff of Moses was the same as the staff used by his brother Aaron has been debated by rabbinical scholars.
1931 - 1956/58
Artists
Marc Chagall
In Grün, Gelb, Rosé und Blau aquarellierte Radierung auf kräftigem chamoisfarbenem Vélin d’Arches
CHF 18,000.00
Edition
7/100
Signature
Monogrammiert sowie mit dem Namenszug (unten rechts) in der Platte.
29,5 x 23 cm (Blatt: 53,5 x 39 cm).
Enquiry
David et Bath-Schéba
Description
MARC CHAGALL



Witebsk 1887 - 1985 Vence



David et Bath-Schéba. Blatt 69 aus der Folge „La Bible“. In Gelb und Grün aquarellierte Radierung, 1931-1956/58.

Sorlier-Vollard 267. Aus Cramer Bücher 30. - Expl. 93/100. Monogrammiert sowie mit dem Namenszug in der Platte. Auf kräftigem chamoisfarbenem Vélin d’Arches. 28,5 x 25,2 cm (Blatt: 53,5 x 38,2 cm).



In the spring, at the time when kings go off to war, David sent Joab out with the king’s men and the whole Israelite army. They destroyed the Ammonites and besieged Rabbah. But David remained in Jerusalem.



2 One evening David got up from his bed and walked around on the roof of the palace. From the roof he saw a woman bathing. The woman was very beautiful, 3 and David sent someone to find out about her. The man said, “She is Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam and the wife of Uriah the Hittite.” 4 Then David sent messengers to get her. She came to him, and he slept with her. (Now she was purifying herself from her monthly uncleanness.) Then she went back home. 5 The woman conceived and sent word to David, saying, “I am pregnant.”



6 So David sent this word to Joab: “Send me Uriah the Hittite.” And Joab sent him to David. 7 When Uriah came to him, David asked him how Joab was, how the soldiers were and how the war was going. 8 Then David said to Uriah, “Go down to your house and wash your feet.” So Uriah left the palace, and a gift from the king was sent after him. 9 But Uriah slept at the entrance to the palace with all his master’s servants and did not go down to his house.



10 David was told, “Uriah did not go home.” So he asked Uriah, “Haven’t you just come from a military campaign? Why didn’t you go home?”



11 Uriah said to David, “The ark and Israel and Judah are staying in tents,[a] and my commander Joab and my lord’s men are camped in the open country. How could I go to my house to eat and drink and make love to my wife? As surely as you live, I will not do such a thing!”



12 Then David said to him, “Stay here one more day, and tomorrow I will send you back.” So Uriah remained in Jerusalem that day and the next. 13 At David’s invitation, he ate and drank with him, and David made him drunk. But in the evening Uriah went out to sleep on his mat among his master’s servants; he did not go home.



14 In the morning David wrote a letter to Joab and sent it with Uriah. 15 In it he wrote, “Put Uriah out in front where the fighting is fiercest. Then withdraw from him so he will be struck down and die.”



16 So while Joab had the city under siege, he put Uriah at a place where he knew the strongest defenders were. 17 When the men of the city came out and fought against Joab, some of the men in David’s army fell; moreover, Uriah the Hittite died.



18 Joab sent David a full account of the battle. 19 He instructed the messenger: “When you have finished giving the king this account of the battle, 20 the king’s anger may flare up, and he may ask you, ‘Why did you get so close to the city to fight? Didn’t you know they would shoot arrows from the wall? 21 Who killed Abimelek son of Jerub-Besheth[b]? Didn’t a woman drop an upper millstone on him from the wall, so that he died in Thebez? Why did you get so close to the wall?’ If he asks you this, then say to him, ‘Moreover, your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead.’”



22 The messenger set out, and when he arrived he told David everything Joab had sent him to say. 23 The messenger said to David, “The men overpowered us and came out against us in the open, but we drove them back to the entrance of the city gate. 24 Then the archers shot arrows at your servants from the wall, and some of the king’s men died. Moreover, your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead.”



25 David told the messenger, “Say this to Joab: ‘Don’t let this upset you; the sword devours one as well as another. Press the attack against the city and destroy it.’ Say this to encourage Joab.”



26 When Uriah’s wife heard that her husband was dead, she mourned for him. 27 After the time of mourning was over, David had her brought to his house, and she became his wife and bore him a son. But the thing David had done displeased the Lord.
1931 - 1956/58
Artists
Marc Chagall
In Gelb und Grün aquarellierte Radierung auf kräftigem chamoisfarbenem Vélin d’Arches
CHF 18,000.00
Edition
93/100
Signature
Monogrammiert sowie mit dem Namenszug (unten rechts) in der Platte.
28,5 x 25,2 cm (Blatt: 53,5 x 38,2 cm)
Enquiry
Ohne Titel
Description
Martin Disler (Seewen 1949 – 1996 Genf). Ohne Titel. 1989



Acryl und Kohle auf Papier, durch den Künstler auf Leinwand aufgezogen. 140 × 107 cm (55 ⅛ × 42 ⅛ in.). Rückseitig mit einem Etikett der Galerie Studio d'Arte Cannaviello, Mailand.

[3009]

Provenienz: 2020 in der Galerie Studio d'Arte Cannaviello, Mailand, erworben



Zustandsbericht: In gutem Zustand. Die Farben frisch und intensiv. Die Ecken und Ränder des Papiers stellenweise minimal bestoßen und mit feinen Bereibungsspuren. Die Ecken mit Montierungslöchern. Vereinzelt winzige Fleckchen und das Papier punktuell minimal angeraut (Atelierspuren). Unter UV-Licht sind keine Retuschen oder Restaurierungen erkennbar. Schöner harmonischer Gesamteindruck.
1989 - 1989
Artists
Martin Disler
Acryl und Kohle auf Papier, durch den Künstler auf Leinwand aufgezogen
CHF 18,000.00
Signature
Rückseitig mit einem Etikett der Galerie Studio d'Arte Cannaviello, Mailand
140 × 107 cm (55 ⅛ × 42 ⅛ in.).
Enquiry
Hibou - Arlequin
1955 - 1955
Artists
Max Ernst
Farblithographie auf BFK Rives-Velin
CHF 6,000.00
Edition
85/200
Signature
Signiert unten rechts in Bleistift "max ernst".
46,5 x 34,7 cm (56 x 46 cm).
Enquiry
Fan Dance
2022 - 2022
Artists
Amy Ernst
Collage und Monotypie auf Papier · Collage and monotype on paper
CHF 11,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Signiert unten rechts 'Amy Ernst' · Signed lower right 'Amy Ernst'
76.2 x 55.9 cm
Enquiry
Doppelportrait mit Londa
Description
Felixmüller, Conrad (Dresden 1897 - 1977 Berlin)Drawing "Doppelportrait mit Londa", pencil on buff wove paper (papier vélin), portrait of the artist's wife next to a woman from Bielefeld (Frau Becker?), Londa Felixmüller wears a silver pendant of the Bielefeld goldsmith Rudolf Feldmann, with whom the artist was also well acquainted, signed and dated lower left "C. Felixmüller Bielefeld 1924", sheet 50,5 x 32 cm, very good original condition, unframed 4304 Possibly the depicted Bielefeld woman is the wife of Dr. Heinrich Becker, from the same year (1924) existed in the Becker collection portraits of the daughter Lydia and the son Arnold by Conrad Felixmüller (see catalog Auktionshaus OWL 22.10.2022, lot 55171 Prov.: Gift of the artist to Dr. Heinrich Becker, collection Dr. Heinrich Becker Bielefeld, possession of the daughter Lydia Villanua-Becker Madrid (*1912 Bielefeld), private collection East Westphalia, Dr. Heinrich Becker (Braunschweig 1881 - 1964 Bielefeld) was director of the Städtisches Kunsthaus Bielefeld (precursor of the Kunsthalle Bielefeld from 1927 to 1933 and from 1946 to 1954, during this time he organized more than 80 exhibitions with works by Käthe Kollwitz, August Macke, Edvard Munch or Emil Nolde, among others.
1923 - 1923
Artists
Konrad Felixmüller
Bleistift auf chamois Velin (pencil on chamois velin)
CHF 11,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
unten links signiert und datiert "C. Felixmüller Bielefeld 1924 (signed ans dated)
50.5 x 32 cm
Enquiry
Sich rasierender Mann
1981 - 1981
Artists
Rainer Fetting
Acryl auf starkem Papier
CHF 14,000.00
Signature
Unten rechts signiert und datiert
86 x 60.5 cm
Enquiry
Marc
1990
Artists
Rainer Fetting
Öl auf Leinwand
CHF 58,000.00
Edition
Unikat
90 x 70 cm
Enquiry
Standing Female Nude
1940
Artists
George Grosz
Öl und Mischtechnik (Collage) auf Karton, verso Disrobing nude, Sepia Rohrfeder und Feder, 1940
CHF 37,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Nachlassnummer 1-A23-3
72.3 x 39.3 cm
Enquiry
Female Nude, Cape Cod
1940
Artists
George Grosz
Öl und Mischtechnik auf leichtem Karton, verso Sitting Female nude, Aquarell und Kreide, 1940
CHF 35,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Nachlassnummer 1-A20-3
63.8 x 48.4 cm
Enquiry
Abgeordnete Berlin, und Liebknecht spricht
1923
Artists
George Grosz
Tuschpinsel, Rohrfeder und Feder auf Vélin
CHF 25,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Nachlassnummer 3-71-2
65 x 52.6 cm
Enquiry
Figurinen zu Nebeneinander von Georg Kaiser
Description
Ausstellungen:



2007, Rom, ,,George Grosz. Berlin-New York'', Academie de France à Rome, Villa Medici, 9. Mai-

15. Juli, 2007, Kat.-Nr. 144, Seite 122



2015 Solingen, ,,George Grosz. Alltag und Bühne - Berlin 1914-1931'', 3. Mai-14. Juni, Abb. Seite 85.

Weitere Station 2015: Kunstmuseurn Bayreuth, 28. Juni-11. Oktober 2015
1922
Artists
George Grosz
Aquarell und Feder auf Vélin
CHF 68,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Signiert und bezeichnet, Nachlassnummer UC-381-3
46 x 56.4 cm
Enquiry
Wodkadrinker and Stickmen
Description
2018 Kaufbeuren, Kunsthaus Kaufbeuren, ,,Menschenbilder. Ernst Barlach/Otto Dix/George Grosz/ Samuel Jessurun de Mesquita'', 14. Dezember 2018-22. April 2019, Kat.-Nr. 71, Seite 83
1950
Artists
George Grosz
Rohrfeder, Feder und Kohle auf Vélin
CHF 18,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Nachlassnummer 4-82-2
50.1 x 39.3 cm
Enquiry
Wahl aus dem Gefängnis
Description
Ausstellungen:



2015 Solingen, ,,George Grosz. Alltag und Bühne -Berlin 1914-1931'', 3. Mai-14. Juni,

Abb. Seite 107.



Weitere Station: Kunstmuseum Bayreuth, 28. Juni-11. Oktober 2015
1924
Artists
George Grosz
Tuschpinsel, Rohrfeder, Feder und Spritztechnik auf Vélin
CHF 56,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Signaturstempel, Nachlassnummer 2-135-8
65.2 x 52.7 cm
Enquiry
Who will win the War in Spain?
1937
Artists
George Grosz
Tuschpinsel, Rohrfeder, Feder über Kreide auf Vélin
CHF 33,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Signiert und bezeichnet, Nachlassnummer 4-73-4
59.5 x 46.2 cm
Enquiry
Lying Female Nude in the Dunes, Cape Cod
1940
Artists
George Grosz
Aquarell und farbige Rohrfeder und Feder auf Velin, verso Lying Female nude in the Dunes, Cape Cod, Aquarell und farbige Feder, 1940
CHF 25,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Nachlassnummer 2-129-4
55.7 x 45.3 cm
Enquiry
Close Combat
1937
Artists
George Grosz
Rohrfeder und Feder auf Vélin
CHF 33,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Signiert und verso bezeichnet "17 battle 2" , Nachlassnummer 4-66-7
46.2 x 59.5 cm
Enquiry
Sitzendes Mädchen im Profil
1924
Artists
George Grosz
Rohrfeder und Feder auf Vélin
CHF 26,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Nachlassnummer 2-129-4
65 x 52.7 cm
Enquiry
Strassenszene Berlin, mit Passanten und Kohleträger, verso Passanten mit Karren und Matratze vor Damenbekleidungsgeschäft
1930
Artists
George Grosz
Rohrfeder und Feder auf Vélin
CHF 28,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Nachlassnummer 3-119-6
52.5 x 65.2 cm
Enquiry
Figurine zu Nebeneinander von Georg Kaiser
Description
Ausstellungen:



2015 Solingen, ,,George Grosz. Alltag und Bühne -Berlin 1914-1931'', 3. Mai-14. Juni,

Abb. Seite 107.



Weitere Station: Kunstmuseum Bayreuth, 28. Juni-11. Oktober 2015
1923
Artists
George Grosz
Aquarell, Rohrfeder und Feder auf Vélin
CHF 48,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
Nachlassnummer 1-28-3
48.7 x 27.4 cm
Enquiry
Stralsund
Description
Stralsund. 1912.

Holzschnitt.

Ebner/Gabelmann 533 H B, Dube H 243 B (von B). Signiert und datiert. Mit der handschriftlichen Bezeichnung des Druckers "gedr. F. Voigt". Eines von 40 Exemplaren. Auf Velin. 30,1 x 36,5 cm (11,8 x 14,3 in). Blattgröße: 61 x 51 cm (24 x 20 in).

Gedruckt von Fritz Voigt, Berlin, und herausgegeben von J.B. Neumann, Berlin. Blatt 1 der Mappe "Elf Holzschnitte, 1912-1919, Erich Heckel bei J.B. Neumann", Berlin 1921.

• Aus der gesuchten Berliner "Brücke"-Zeit.

• Aus einem reichen Liniengeflecht und nahezu geometrischen Formen schafft Heckel eine rhythmisierte, mosaikähnliche Darstellung der Altstadt Stralsunds.

• Stralsund besucht der Künstler 1912 auf dem Weg zur Insel Hiddensee, wo Heckel 1912 mit seiner Lebensgefährtin Siddi die Sommermonate verbringt.

• Weitere Exemplare dieses Holzschnitts sind Teil bedeutender musealer Sammlungen, darunter das Städel Museum, Frankfurt a. Main, und das Brooklyn Museum, New York.

• Im selben Jahr schafft Heckel auch ein gleichnamiges, motivisch eng verwandtes Gemälde (Voigt 1912/26).



PROVENIENZ: Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Würzburg (mit dem Sammlerstempel, Lugt 6032).



AUSSTELLUNG: Schleswig-Holsteinisches Landesmuseum, Schloss Gottorf, Schleswig (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 1995-2001).

Kunstmuseum Moritzburg, Halle an der Saale (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 2001-2017).

Buchheim Museum, Bernried (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 2017-2022).



LITERATUR: Heinz Spielmann (Hrsg.), Die Maler der Brücke. Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Stuttgart 1995, S. 199, SHG-Nr. 246 (m. Abb.).

Hermann Gerlinger, Katja Schneider (Hrsg.), Die Maler der Brücke. Bestandskatalog Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Halle (Saale) 2005, S. 194, SHG-Nr. 434 (m. Abb.).
1912 - 1912
Artists
Erich Heckel
Holzschnitt auf Velin
CHF 14,000.00
Edition
40 Exemplare
Signature
Unten rechts signiert und datiert
30,1 x 36,5 auf 61 x 51 cm
Enquiry
Frauen am Strand
Description
Frauen am Strand. 1919.

Holzschnitt.

Ebner/Gabelmann 743 B (von B). Dube 320 I B (von II). Signiert und datiert. Bezeichnet "gedr. F. Voigt". Eines von 40 Exemplaren. Auf Velin. 46,1 x 32,7 cm (18,1 x 12,8 in). Papier: 60,8 x 51,5 cm (23,9 x 20,1 in).

Gedruckt von Fritz Voigt, Berlin. Blatt 10 aus der Mappe "Elf Holzschnitte, 1912-1919, Erich Heckel bei J.B. Neumann", Berlin 1921 [EH].



PROVENIENZ: Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Würzburg (mit dem Sammlerstempel, Lugt 6032).



LITERATUR: Heinz Spielmann (Hrsg.), Die Maler der Brücke. Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Stuttgart 1995, S. 306, SHG-Nr. 467 (m. Abb.).

Hermann Gerlinger, Katja Schneider (Hrsg.), Die Maler der Brücke. Bestandskatalog Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Halle (Saale) 2005, S. 216, SHG-Nr. 488 (m. Abb.).
1919 - 1919
Artists
Erich Heckel
Holzschnitt auf Velin
CHF 14,000.00
Edition
40 Exemplare
Signature
Unten rechts signiert und datiert
46,1 x 32,7 auf 60,8 x 51,5 cm
Enquiry
Mädchen am Meer
Description
Mädchen am Meer. 1918.

Holzschnitt.

Ebner Gabelmann 730 H B (von B). Dube H 314 B (von B) . Signiert und datiert. Bezeichnet "gedr. F. Voigt". Eines von 40 Exemplaren. Auf Velin. 45,8 x 32,3 cm (18 x 12,7 in). Papier: 61,8 x 50,8 cm (24,3 x 20 in).

Gedruckt von Fritz Voigt, Berlin. Blatt 9 aus der Mappe "Elf Holzschnitte, 1912-1919, Erich Heckel bei J.B. Neumann", Berlin 1921.



PROVENIENZ: Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Würzburg (mit dem Sammlerstempel, Lugt 6032).



AUSSTELLUNG: Schleswig-Holsteinisches Landesmuseum, Schloss Gottorf, Schleswig (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 1995-2001).

Kunstmuseum Moritzburg, Halle an der Saale (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 2001-2017).

Buchheim Museum, Bernried (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 2017-2022).



LITERATUR: Heinz Spielmann (Hrsg.), Die Maler der Brücke. Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Stuttgart 1995, S. 304, SHG-Nr. 462 (m. Abb.).

Hermann Gerlinger, Katja Schneider (Hrsg.), Die Maler der Brücke. Bestandskatalog Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Halle (Saale) 2005, S. 214, SHG-Nr. 482 (m. Abb.).
1918 - 1918
Artists
Erich Heckel
Holzschnitt auf Velin
CHF 16,000.00
Edition
40 Exemplare
Signature
Unten rechts signiert und datiert
45,8 x 32,3 auf 61,8 x 50,8 cm
Enquiry
Kniende am Stein
Description
Knieende am Stein. 1913.

Holzschnitt.

Ebner/Gabelmann 589 H a B (von b). Dube H 258 a B (von b). Signiert und datiert. Bezeichnet "gedr. F. Voigt". Aus einer Auflage von 40 Exemplaren. Auf Velin. 49,9 x 32,3 cm (19,6 x 12,7 in). Papier: 61 x 51,3 cm (24 x 20,1 in).

Gedruckt von Fritz Voigt, Berlin. Blatt 2 aus der die Mappe "Elf Holzschnitte, 1912-1919, Erich Heckel bei J.B. Neumann", Berlin 1921.

• Historisch bedeutendes Entstehungsjahr: 1913 gibt die Künstlergruppe aufgrund interner Unstimmigkeiten ihre Auflösung bekannt.

• Weitere Exemplare dieses Holzschnitts sind Teil bedeutender musealer Sammlungen, darunter das Museum of Modern Art, New York, das Städel Museum, Frankfurt a. Main, und das Brücke-Museum, Berlin.

• Im darauffolgenden Jahr schafft Heckel u. a. auch das motivisch eng verwandte Gemälde "Badende am Stein" (Hüneke 1914-22).

• Badende, Akte im Freien und ihre ungezwungene Nacktheit gehören seit der Dresdener Schaffenszeit an den Moritzburger Teichen zu den Hauptmotiven Heckels und der "Brücke"-Künstler.



PROVENIENZ: Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Würzburg (mit dem Sammlerstempel, Lugt 6032).



AUSSTELLUNG: Schleswig-Holsteinisches Landesmuseum, Schloss Gottorf, Schleswig (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 1995-2001).

Kunstmuseum Moritzburg, Halle an der Saale (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 2001-2017).

Buchheim Museum, Bernried (Dauerleihgabe aus der Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, 2017-2022).



LITERATUR: Heinz Spielmann (Hrsg.), Die Maler der Brücke. Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Stuttgart 1995, S. 291, SHG-Nr. 429 (m. Abb., S. 290).

Hermann Gerlinger, Katja Schneider (Hrsg.), Die Maler der Brücke. Bestandskatalog Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger, Halle (Saale) 2005, S. 200, SHG-Nr. 447 (m. Abb.).
1913 - 1913
Artists
Erich Heckel
Holzschnitt auf Velin
CHF 14,000.00
Edition
40 Exemplare
Signature
Unten rechts signiert und datiert
49,9 x 32,3 auf 61 x 51,3 cm
Enquiry
San Mamete (Valsolda)
Description
»Er ist ein Dichter, der malt und ein Maler, der dichtet. Sein Umgang mit Farbe ist nicht weniger poetisch als sein Umgang mit Worten. Wie Märchen zeigen sie das Unwirkliche wirklich und das Wirkliche unwirklich.« (1) Dieser Passus von Volker Michels beschreibt äußerst treffend Hermann Hesses Beziehung zur Malerei. So versuchte der Maler nicht nur die Realität in seinen Arbeiten abzubilden, sondern erzeugte vielmehr ein märchenhaftes Ideal in seinen Bildern. Mehr und mehr ging es ihm in seinen Aquarellen darum, seinen Empfindungen beim Anblick des Motivs Ausdruck zu verleihen und die Landschaften mittels einer Reduktion in ihrer Charakteristik einzufangen. Auch in unseren beiden Aquarellen wird auf diese Art die den Künstler umgebende Erscheinungswelt auf freie Weise paraphrasiert. Während in »San Mamete (Valsolda)« klare geometrische Farbfelder, umrahmt von zarten Bleistiftlinien, die freundliche italienische Landschaft am Ufer des Luganer Sees dominieren, schuf der Künstler die Arbeit »Tessiner Dorflandschaft« noch in einer abstrakteren, kubistischeren Schaffensphase. Hier gehen die geometrischen, randlosen Farbformen ineinander über, überlagern einander in ihren blassen Schattierungen und erzeugen somit eine bunte Unruhe, die die wilde Schönheit der Tessiner Natur einzufangen vermag. Die Wahl einer freundlichen, hellen Farbgebung zieht sich durch das gesamte malerische Schaffen Hesses und könnte auf den damaligen Gemütszustand des Künstlers zurückzuführen sein, der, von den Schrecken des Krieges abgestoßen, eine Art friedliche Gegenwelt in seinen Bildern suchte. So begann Hesse erst im Alter von 40 Jahren, sich im Zuge seiner traumatisierenden Erfahrungen während des Ersten Weltkrieges der Malerei zuzuwenden. Insbesondere nach seiner Übersiedlung in das nahe des Luganer Sees gelegene Dörfchen Montagnola erschuf er als Autodidakt ein umfassendes malerisches OEuvre, welches sich vornehmlich mit der atmosphärischen Berglandschaft des Tessin beschäftigte. Auch zahlreiche Gedichtillustrationen entstanden in dieser Zeit. Zu Beginn widmete Hesse den Erlös aus seiner Malerei der Kriegsgefangenenfürsorge, später unterstützte er mit den Verkäufen seiner illustrierten Gedichtzyklen Emigranten und bedürftige Kolleg:innen. Sowohl das zarte, fast ornamental wirkende Blumenbouquet zum Gedicht »Stufen« als auch die ähnlich einer Postkarte oder einem Fensterausschnitt angelegte Landschaft zu »Zur Erinnerung an Montagnola« verleihen den handschriftlichen Gedichten Hermann Hesses eine optische Frische und persönliche Note, die seiner Lyrik einen angemessenen visuellen Rahmen verleihen. 1 Volker Michels, »Farbe ist Leben – Hermann Hesse als Maler«, S.11-28, in: Galerie Ludorff, »Malerfreude – Hermann Hesse«, Ausst.-Kat., Düsseldorf 2016, S. 19.



‘He is a poet who paints and a painter who writes poetry. His use of colour is no less poetic than his use of words. Like fairy tales, they show the unreal as real and the real as unreal.’ (1) This passage by Volker Michels aptly describes Hermann Hesse's relationship to painting. The painter not only attempted to depict reality in his works, but also created a fairytale-like ideal in his pictures. In his watercolours, he was increasingly concerned with expressing his feelings at the sight of the motif and capturing the characteristics of the landscapes by means of reduction. In our two watercolours, too, the world of appearances surrounding the artist is paraphrased in a free manner. While clear geometric colour fields framed by delicate pencil lines dominate the friendly Italian landscape on the shores of Lake Lugano in ‘San Mamete (Valsolda)’, the artist created the work ‘Ticino Village Landscape’ in a more abstract, cubist creative phase. Here, the geometric, borderless colour forms merge into one another, overlapping in their pale shades and thus creating a colourful restlessness that captures the wild beauty of Ticino's nature. The choice of a friendly, bright colour scheme runs through Hesse's entire painterly oeuvre and could be due to the artist's state of mind at the time, who, repulsed by the horrors of war, sought a kind of peaceful counter-world in his paintings. Hesse only began to turn to painting at the age of 40 as a result of his traumatising experiences during the First World War. In particular, after moving to the small village of Montagnola near Lake Lugano, he created an extensive oeuvre of paintings as a self-taught artist, which primarily focused on the atmospheric mountain landscape of Ticino. Numerous poetry illustrations were also created during this time. At the beginning, Hesse dedicated the proceeds from his paintings to the welfare of prisoners of war, later he supported emigrants and needy colleagues with the sales of his illustrated poetry cycles. Both the delicate, almost ornamental bouquet of flowers in the poem ‘Stufen’ and the landscape in ‘Zur Erinnerung an Montagnola’, which resembles a postcard or a window detail, lend Hermann Hesse's handwritten poems a visual freshness and personal touch that lend his poetry an appropriate visual framework. 1 Volker Michels, ‘Farbe ist Leben - Hermann Hesse als Maler’, pp. 11-28, in: Galerie Ludorff, ‘Malerfreude - Hermann Hesse’, exhib. cat., Düsseldorf 2016, p. 19.
ca. 1925
Artists
Hermann Hesse
Aquarell und Bleistift auf Japanpapier
CHF 50,000.00
Edition
Unikat
Signature
"um 1925" datiert, betitelt und "Bruno Hesse CH- 3399 Oschwand" gestempelt auf dem alten Unterlagekarton ‘c. 1925’ dated, titled and ‘Bruno Hesse CH- 3399 Oschwand’ stamped on the old backing cardboard
21.7 x 18 cm
Enquiry
Tessiner Dorf am See
Description
»Er ist ein Dichter, der malt und ein Maler, der dichtet. Sein Umgang mit Farbe ist nicht weniger poetisch als sein Umgang mit Worten. Wie Märchen zeigen sie das Unwirkliche wirklich und das Wirkliche unwirklich.« (1) Dieser Passus von Volker Michels beschreibt äußerst treffend Hermann Hesses Beziehung zur Malerei. So versuchte der Maler nicht nur die Realität in seinen Arbeiten abzubilden, sondern erzeugte vielmehr ein märchenhaftes Ideal in seinen Bildern. Mehr und mehr ging es ihm in seinen Aquarellen darum, seinen Empfindungen beim Anblick des Motivs Ausdruck zu verleihen und die Landschaften mittels einer Reduktion in ihrer Charakteristik einzufangen. Auch in unseren beiden Aquarellen wird auf diese Art die den Künstler umgebende Erscheinungswelt auf freie Weise paraphrasiert. Während in »San Mamete (Valsolda)« klare geometrische Farbfelder, umrahmt von zarten Bleistiftlinien, die freundliche italienische Landschaft am Ufer des Luganer Sees dominieren, schuf der Künstler die Arbeit »Tessiner Dorflandschaft« noch in einer abstrakteren, kubistischeren Schaffensphase. Hier gehen die geometrischen, randlosen Farbformen ineinander über, überlagern einander in ihren blassen Schattierungen und erzeugen somit eine bunte Unruhe, die die wilde Schönheit der Tessiner Natur einzufangen vermag. Die Wahl einer freundlichen, hellen Farbgebung zieht sich durch das gesamte malerische Schaffen Hesses und könnte auf den damaligen Gemütszustand des Künstlers zurückzuführen sein, der, von den Schrecken des Krieges abgestoßen, eine Art friedliche Gegenwelt in seinen Bildern suchte. So begann Hesse erst im Alter von 40 Jahren, sich im Zuge seiner traumatisierenden Erfahrungen während des Ersten Weltkrieges der Malerei zuzuwenden. Insbesondere nach seiner Übersiedlung in das nahe des Luganer Sees gelegene Dörfchen Montagnola erschuf er als Autodidakt ein umfassendes malerisches OEuvre, welches sich vornehmlich mit der atmosphärischen Berglandschaft des Tessin beschäftigte. Auch zahlreiche Gedichtillustrationen entstanden in dieser Zeit. Zu Beginn widmete Hesse den Erlös aus seiner Malerei der Kriegsgefangenenfürsorge, später unterstützte er mit den Verkäufen seiner illustrierten Gedichtzyklen Emigranten und bedürftige Kolleg:innen. Sowohl das zarte, fast ornamental wirkende Blumenbouquet zum Gedicht »Stufen« als auch die ähnlich einer Postkarte oder einem Fensterausschnitt angelegte Landschaft zu »Zur Erinnerung an Montagnola« verleihen den handschriftlichen Gedichten Hermann Hesses eine optische Frische und persönliche Note, die seiner Lyrik einen angemessenen visuellen Rahmen verleihen. 1 Volker Michels, »Farbe ist Leben – Hermann Hesse als Maler«, S.11-28, in: Galerie Ludorff, »Malerfreude – Hermann Hesse«, Ausst.-Kat., Düsseldorf 2016, S. 19.
1924
Artists
Hermann Hesse
Aquarell und Tusche auf Papier
CHF 38,000.00
Edition
Unikat
21.5 x 17 cm
Enquiry
Teppozu, Tsukiji Monzeki
Description
Veröffentlichung

Hiroshige war um 1830 ein weitgehend unbekannter Künstler, der bis dahin nur wenige Aufträge für den Entwurf von Farbholzschnitten erhalten hatte. Um 1830 übertrug ihm der Verleger Kawaguchiya Shōzō den Auftrag, eine Serie von großformatigen Drucken (das heißt Drucke im ōban-Format) von Ansichten bekannter Orte in Edo zu gestalten („Berühmte Ansichten der Osthauptstadt“, Tōto meisho, 東都名所). Die Serie war kein überragender Erfolg, erlebte jedoch bereits mehrere Auflagen, wie unterschiedliche Druckzustände belegen.[6] Die Serie, die Hiroshige als Künstler der Landschaftsdrucke (fūkeiga, 風景画) bekannt machte, war die Serie dem Titel „Die 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“ (Tōkaidō gojūsan tsugi no uchi).[7]



Zu Beginn der 1830er Jahre erschienen die ersten Drucke dieser Serie und waren ebenso wie die vorhergehende Serie im ōban-Querformat angelegt. Gemeinsame Verleger der ersten elf Drucke waren Tsuruya Kiemon und Takenouchi Magohachi, der Druck der Station Okabe wurde alleine von Tsuruya Kiemon herausgegeben und die weiteren 43 Drucke produzierte Takenouchi Magohachi alleine. Wer die Idee für dieses Projekt hatte und wer wen zuerst angesprochen hat, ist nicht mehr zu klären.[3] Für Takenouchi Magohachi war es das erste Projekt als Verleger,[8] Tsuruya Kiemon war ein alteingesessenes Verlagshaus.[9] Nach Tsuruya Kiemons Ausscheiden, über dessen Gründe nichts bekannt ist, führte Takenouchi Magohachi das Projekt alleine fort.





Titel auf dem Vorsatzblatt, Vorwort und Inhaltsverzeichnis der ersten Gesamtausgabe

Die Drucke zeigen Szenen rund um die Stationen des Tōkaidō, der damals wichtigsten Überlandverbindung von Edo nach Kyōto, und deren umliegende Landschaften sowie zusätzlich den Startpunkt Nihonbashi in Edo und die Endstation bei Kyōto (damals auch Keishi genannt). Sie sind nicht in der Reihenfolge der Stationen entstanden; allenfalls orientierte sich die Reihenfolge der Entwürfe lose an der Abfolge der Raststationen.[Anm. 1]



Beim Publikum und den zeitgenössischen Kritikern fanden die Drucke großen Anklang[7] und wurden, nachdem alle Einzeldrucke erschienen waren, von Takenouchi Magohachi in zwei Bänden in Buchform herausgegeben. Der Titel auf dem Einband der Bücher lautete „Aufeinanderfolgende Bilder der 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“ (Shinkei Tōkaidō gojūsan eki tsuzukie, 真景東海道五十三駅続畫).[5] Der Serientitel auf den Drucken selbst blieb unverändert. Allerdings waren die Drucke in den beiden Bänden mittig vertikal gefaltet, da die Bücher im chūban-Format (halbes ōban-Format) erschienen. Viele der heute erhaltenen Drucke der Serie weisen diese Mittelfalte als Hinweis darauf aus, dass sie ursprünglich aus einem dieser Bücher stammen.[4] Heute ist kein vollständiges Exemplar der Erstauflage dieser Bücher mehr bekannt.[10]



Schätzungen zufolge wurden von einzelnen Blättern der Serie bis zu 25.000 Exemplare von den ersten Druckplatten gefertigt, bis diese nicht mehr zu gebrauchen waren.[11][4] Bereits im 19. Jahrhundert waren neue Platten geschnitten worden, um weitere Auflagen anzufertigen.[12] Im 20. Jahrhundert erfolgten weitere Neuauflagen[13] und selbst im 3. Jahrtausend werden noch immer Drucke dieser Serie als Farbholzschnitte und Reproduktionen verkauft.[14]



Ein größerer Teil der Drucke wurde nach der Erstveröffentlichung einer Überarbeitung unterzogen (Änderung der Farbpalette, Ausfüllen kleiner Fehlstellen, Weglassen einzelner Konturlinien etc.), so dass sie in zahlreichen unterschiedlichen Varianten erhalten sind. Ob diese Veränderungen auf Überlegungen Hiroshiges oder des Verlegers oder gar beider zurückzuführen ist, ist heute nicht mehr feststellbar. Gesichert ist, dass einige der Änderungen bereits nach der ersten Auflage erfolgt sein müssen, da einzelne Blätter im Zustand der Erstauflage extrem selten sind.[15] Von sechs Stationen wurde in der zweiten Hälfte der 1830er Jahre eine zweite Druckversion angefertigt, die möglicherweise verlorengegangene oder beschädigte Druckplatten ersetzten.[16] Diese neuen sind den vorhergehenden Versionen ähnlich, aber nicht mit ihnen identisch.[Anm. 2]



Der kommerzielle Erfolg der Serie Hiroshiges stand im engen Zusammenhang mit dem immens angewachsenen Reiseverkehr in Japan in den ersten Jahrzehnten des 19. Jahrhunderts, die eine Gesellschaft hervorgebracht hatten, die „süchtig nach Reisen und verrückt nach Souvenirs“ war.[17][18] Unmittelbarer Vorgänger von Hiroshiges Serie waren Katsushika Hokusais Drucke der „36 Ansichten des Berges Fuji“, die in ihrem Format und der Bildgestaltung, Darstellung von Menschen, eingebettet in eine sie umgebende Landschaft, Vorbildcharakter sowohl für Hiroshige als auch andere Landschaftsmaler seiner Zeit hatten.[19]



Mit seiner Serie traf Hiroshige jedoch noch mehr als Hokusai den Geschmack breiter Bevölkerungsschichten und setzte den Gedanken des Ukiyo als der „heiteren, vergänglichen Welt“ vollendet in den japanischen Landschaftsdruck um. Neu an Hiroshiges künstlerischer Landschaftsauffassung war nicht, dass er „lebendige Straßenszenen mit geschäftigen Menschen aus dem einfachen Volk (zum) Gegenstand der künstlerischen Auseinandersetzung“ machte.[20] Solche Genreszenen waren zuvor bereits unter anderem von Utagawa Toyohiro und Hokusai gezeichnet worden.[Anm. 3] Neu an Hiroshiges Bildern war die harmonische Eingliederung der Menschendarstellung in weitläufige Landschaften. Er gestaltete lyrische Bilder, in denen der Betrachter die Stimmung der Natur ungetrübt von philosophischem Nachsinnen über Natur und Mensch unmittelbar wahrnehmen konnte.[21] Die Drucke der Serie waren durchdrungen von expressiver poetischer Sensibilität.[7] Hiroshiges innovativer Stil und die Wahl des horizontalen ōban-Formats stellten einen neuen Schwerpunkt in der Auffassung des Tōkaidō dar und präsentierten eine neue Art des Landschaftsdruckes. Ihre andauernde Popularität und ihr Einfluss auf andere Künstler sind die Gründe für Hiroshiges Ruhm.[19]



Entstehungsgeschichte

Zur Entstehung der Serie hatte Hiroshige III., Schüler Hiroshiges I. und zweiter Ehemann von dessen Tochter, im Jahr 1894 kurz vor seinem Tod beiläufig in einem Zeitungsinterview geäußert, dass die Drucke der Serie auf Entwürfe zurückzuführen seien, die Hiroshige I. als Angehöriger einer offiziellen Delegation des Shōgun angefertigt habe.[10] Die Delegation habe im Jahr 1832 den Auftrag gehabt, ein Pferd als Geschenk des Shōgun Tokugawa Ienari von Edo an den Kaiserhof in Kyōto zu überbringen. Unterwegs habe Hiroshige seine Reiseeindrücke in Skizzen festgehalten und nach seiner Rückkehr nach Edo im 9. Monat des Jahres Tenpō 3 (entspricht in etwa dem September des Jahres 1832) dem Verleger Takenouchi Magohachi angeboten, die Skizzen als Vorlagen für eine Farbholzschnittserie umzuarbeiten.[22] Diese Geschichte übernahm zunächst Iijima Kyōshin in sein 1894 erschienenes Buch „Biografien der Ukiyo-e-Künstler der Utagawa-Schule“ (Utagawa retsuden, 浮世絵師歌川列伝).[23] Dann wurde sie 1930 von Minoru Uchida in dessen erste umfassende Biografie Hiroshiges[24] aufgenommen.[10] Von da an fand sie sich ungeprüft in der gesamten Literatur, die über Hiroshige erschienen ist. Zum Teil wurde sie soweit ausgeschmückt, dass Hiroshige möglicherweise sogar im Auftrag des Shōgun seine Skizzen angefertigt habe.[25]



Suzuki äußerte 1970 in seinem Buch „Hiroshige“[26] erste Zweifel an dieser Entstehungsgeschichte, indem er auf die Ähnlichkeit der Hiroshige-Drucke der Stationen Ishibe und Kanaya mit den entsprechenden Abbildungen im bereits 1797 erschienenen Tokaidō meisho zue hinwies.[10] Matthi Forrer griff 1997 diese Zweifel auf und wies auf die Unmöglichkeit hin, dass die Serie in 15 Monaten von Oktober 1832 bis zum Ende des Jahres 1834 fertiggestellt worden sein konnte.[22] Weitere Zweifel äußerte Timothy Clark 2004 und bezog sich dabei auf einen 1998 von Jun’ichi Okubo in Japan veröffentlichten Artikel. Clark hält die Geschichte von der Beteiligung Hiroshiges an einer offiziellen Delegation für einen Schwindel.[27] 2004 erschien die bislang umfassendste Monografie über Hiroshiges erste Tōkaidō-Serie von Jūzō Suzuki, Yaeko Kimura und Jun’ichi Okubo, Hiroshige Tōkaidō gojūsantsugi: Hoeidō-ban. Die Autoren wiesen darin nach, dass 26 der 55 Drucke der Serie auf zeitgenössische Vorlagen anderer Künstler zurückzuführen sind. Zudem sei eine Beteiligung von Hiroshige (bzw. Andō als seinem bürgerlichen Namen) an einer shōgunalen Delegation in den erhaltenen Akten nicht verzeichnet. Ebenso wenig ist eine solche Reise im noch zu Lebzeiten Hiroshiges erschienenen Ukiyo-e ruikō („Verschiedene Gedanken über Ukiyo-e“, 浮世絵類考), einer Art zeitgenössischen Who’s who der Farbholzschnittkünstler, erwähnt.[10] Dass die Drucke der Serie nicht auf eigene Skizzen Hiroshiges zurückzuführen seien, sondern auf Vorlagen zeitgenössischer Reiseführer, äußerte Andreas Marks im Zusammenhang mit seinen Beschreibungen der Verlegertätigkeit Takenouchi Magohachis in den Jahren 2008 und 2010.[28][8] Nachdem Marks für sein Buch Kunisada’s Tōkaidō weitere Bücher nachweisen konnte, aus denen Hiroshige Anregungen für die Gestaltung seiner Drucke entnommen hat, kommt er zu dem Ergebnis, dass die Geschichte von der Entstehung der Drucke als Reiseskizzen nicht länger aufrechtzuerhalten sei.[29]



Datierung

In Übereinstimmung mit der überlieferten Entstehungsgeschichte im Zusammenhang mit der im Dienste des Shōgun unternommenen Reise und der darin dokumentierten Rückkehr Hiroshiges nach Edo im September 1832 wird in der Literatur als Entstehungsjahr der ersten Drucke der Serie das Jahr 1832 angegeben. Das üblicherweise angegebene Datum für die Fertigstellung der Serie spätestens zum Jahresende 1833 folgt aus dem Vorwort des Autors Yomo no Takisui[30] (andere Lesung des Namens: Yomo Ryūsai[22]), das der ersten Gesamtausgabe vorangestellt und mit dem ersten Monat des Jahres Tenpō 5 (in etwa Januar 1834) datiert ist.





Kunisada, Station Kambara, aus der Serie „Die 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“, ca. 1835

Matthi Forrer geht davon aus, dass das Datum der Fertigstellung durch das Vorwort der Gesamtausgabe korrekt angegeben ist, äußert jedoch Zweifel, ob eine Serie von 55 ōban-Drucken innerhalb von nur 15 Monaten zwischen Oktober 1832 und Dezember 1833 hätte fertiggestellt werden können. Keine andere Farbholzschnittserie im ōban-Format hatte in Japan bis dahin einen solchen Umfang gehabt.[22] Der Verleger Takenouchi Magohachi war Sohn eines Pfandleihers und vor der Produktion der Hiroshige-Drucke nicht als Verleger in Erscheinung getreten.[28] Seine finanziellen Ressourcen bzw. seine Kreditwürdigkeit waren nicht ausreichend, das erforderliche Kapital für die Druckplatten, das Papier, die Farben und die Entlohnung für Holzschneider, Drucker und Künstler sowie die Kosten für einen Laden zum Verkauf der Drucke in so kurzer Zeit aufzubringen. Auch wenn zu Beginn der Produktion mit Tsuruya Kiemon ein alteingesessener Verleger beteiligt war, erscheint nach Forrer eine solch kurze Zeitspanne von 15 Monaten außergewöhnlich kurz. Er folgert daraus, dass sich die Fertigstellung der Drucke über einen längeren Zeitraum erstreckt haben müsse und somit die ersten Drucke im Jahr 1831 oder sogar bereits 1830 erschienen sein müssten.[22]



Jūzō Suzuki äußert darüber hinaus Zweifel am Datum der Fertigstellung der Serie zum Jahresende 1833. Ihm zufolge sei im Impressum der Gesamtausgabe als Adresse die Anschrift eines Ladens angegeben, den Takenouchi Magohachi nicht vor dem Neujahrstag 1836 eröffnet habe.[30]



Suzuki ist ebenfalls davon überzeugt, dass Kunisadas bijin-Serie Tōkaidō Tōkaidō gojūsan tsugi no uchi, bei deren Drucken der Hintergrund in 43 Fällen nach der Vorlage von Hiroshiges Serie gestaltet war, im Jahr 1833 begonnen und im Jahr 1835 vollendet worden war. Die Tatsache, dass 13 der Drucke von Kunisadas Serie einen Hintergrund haben, der von dem der Hiroshige-Drucke abweicht, interpretiert Suzuki so, dass Hiroshige seine Serie im Jahr 1835 noch nicht vollständig entworfen hatte. Kunisadas Verleger, Moriya Jihei und Sanoya Kihei, hätten jedoch darauf gedrängt, die Serie zu vollenden, und daher seien für die letzten, noch fehlenden Drucke Hintergründe aus dem Tokaidō meisho zue und ähnlichen Büchern ausgewählt worden.[30][31]



Yaeko Kimura war die erste, die wissenschaftliche Nachforschungen zur Biografie Takenouchi Magohachis anstellte und dabei unter anderem die verschiedenen von ihm verwendeten Verlegersiegel verglich. Ihrer Ansicht nach könne eine Gesamtausgabe von Hiroshiges Tōkaidō nicht vor dem Neujahrstag 1836 erfolgt sein.[30]



Da weitere Anhaltspunkte für die exakte Datierung der Drucke der Serie fehlen, kann ihre Entstehungszeit insgesamt nur ungefähr auf die erste Hälfte der 1830er Jahre eingegrenzt werden.



Bildgestaltung

Die Drucke sind im horizontalen (yoko-e) ōban-Format (ca. 39 × 26 cm) ausgeführt. Die bedruckte Fläche ist an allen vier Seiten mit einer dünnen schwarzen Linie von der unbedruckten Papierfläche abgegrenzt. Die Ecken sind nach innen abgerundet, so dass sich zusammen mit den jeweils ca. 1,5 cm breiten Rändern der Eindruck eines gerahmten Bildes ergibt. Bei vielen erhaltenen Drucken sind diese Ränder teilweise oder ganz bis auf den Druckrand beschnitten, wodurch der visuelle Eindruck der Drucke stark verändert wird.[4] Besonders auffällig ist dies bei den Drucken der Stationen Hara und Kakegawa, bei denen ein Bildelement den oberen Rahmen „durchbricht“ und bei denen das durch den Beschnitt verursachte Fehlen dieses Elements die Gesamtkomposition des Druckes zerstört.



Auf allen Drucken sind in irgendeiner Form Reisende auf der Tōkai-Straße dargestellt. Abgebildet sind sie in Verbindung mit Wegen, Flusslandschaften, Bergen, Seen und Meerespanoramen sowie Szenen an oder in Raststationen oder Tempeln. Manchmal sind die Reisenden nur winzig klein in Gruppen als Staffage in der Landschaft zu sehen, manchmal sind sie gestalterisches Element der Drucke und mit individuellen Zügen gezeichnet. Die Drucke folgen keinem Programm, außer dem der Darstellung von Reisenden in unterschiedlichen Szenarien. Die auf den Drucken dargestellten Szenen zeigen keine bestimmte Jahreszeit, stattdessen wechseln sich die jahreszeitlichen Impressionen unsystematisch ab; abgebildet sind Szenen aus allen vier Jahreszeiten, mit Sonne, Regen oder Schneefall. Ebenso unterschiedlich und unsystematisch sind die in den Drucken zu erkennenden Tageszeiten: Zu sehen sind Szenen mit Sonnenauf- und -untergang sowie Szenen, die sich im Tagesverlauf oder im Einzelfall auch nachts abspielen.



An einer freien Stelle innerhalb der Bildkomposition befindet sich der Serientitel „Tōkaido gojūsan tsuki no uchi“. Die kanji des Titels sind in zwei bzw. drei Spalten geschrieben. In jeweils einem Fall ist der Titel in einer Spalte (Station Okabe) bzw. einer Zeile (Station Fuchū) geschrieben. Links vom Serientitel befindet sich leicht abgesetzt der Name der jeweiligen Station und wiederum davon links der Untertitel des jeweiligen Druckes; in einigen wenigen Fällen findet sich der Untertitel direkt unterhalb des Stationsnamens. Serientitel und Stationsnamen sind in Schwarz gedruckt; die Untertitel befinden sich in einer roten Kartusche, die in Negativ- oder Positivdruck ausgeführt ist.



Vom Serientitel abgesetzt, in vielen Fällen auf der gegenüberliegenden Seite des Blattes, ist die Signatur Hiroshiges (Hiroshige ga, 廣重画) in schwarzen kanji gedruckt. Unterhalb der Künstlersignatur findet sich ein rotes Verlegersiegel in unterschiedlichen Formen. Bei der zweiten Version des Druckes der Station Odawara findet sich ein zusätzliches rotes Verlegersiegel rechts oberhalb des Serientitels.



Das Zensursiegel kiwame (極 für ‚geprüft‘) befand sich ursprünglich bei allen Drucken auf dem linken unteren Randbereich der Blätter. Bei den ersten drei Stationen, Nihonbashi, Shinagawa und Kawasaki, sowie der Station Totsuka wurde nach der Überarbeitung der Bildkomposition das ursprüngliche gemeinsame Siegel der Verleger Senkakudō und Hoeidō durch ein kalebassenförmiges Siegel Hoeidōs mit einem integrierten Zensursiegel ersetzt und somit das kiwame-Siegel am linken Rand überflüssig. Auf den zweiten Versionen der Drucke der Stationen Kanagawa und Odawara ist das kiwame-Siegel ebenfalls vom linken Rand entfernt und durch ein Verlegersiegel mit integriertem kiwame-Siegel ersetzt worden.
7th month of 1858
Artists
Utagawa (Ando) Hiroshige
Farbholzschnitt auf Japan
CHF 2,800.00
Edition
Unbekannt
Signature
Signature: Hiroshige ga. Publisher: Uwoya Eikichi
35.7 x 24.2 cm
Enquiry
Kakegawa (vertical from 1855)
Description
Veröffentlichung

Hiroshige war um 1830 ein weitgehend unbekannter Künstler, der bis dahin nur wenige Aufträge für den Entwurf von Farbholzschnitten erhalten hatte. Um 1830 übertrug ihm der Verleger Kawaguchiya Shōzō den Auftrag, eine Serie von großformatigen Drucken (das heißt Drucke im ōban-Format) von Ansichten bekannter Orte in Edo zu gestalten („Berühmte Ansichten der Osthauptstadt“, Tōto meisho, 東都名所). Die Serie war kein überragender Erfolg, erlebte jedoch bereits mehrere Auflagen, wie unterschiedliche Druckzustände belegen.[6] Die Serie, die Hiroshige als Künstler der Landschaftsdrucke (fūkeiga, 風景画) bekannt machte, war die Serie dem Titel „Die 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“ (Tōkaidō gojūsan tsugi no uchi).[7]



Zu Beginn der 1830er Jahre erschienen die ersten Drucke dieser Serie und waren ebenso wie die vorhergehende Serie im ōban-Querformat angelegt. Gemeinsame Verleger der ersten elf Drucke waren Tsuruya Kiemon und Takenouchi Magohachi, der Druck der Station Okabe wurde alleine von Tsuruya Kiemon herausgegeben und die weiteren 43 Drucke produzierte Takenouchi Magohachi alleine. Wer die Idee für dieses Projekt hatte und wer wen zuerst angesprochen hat, ist nicht mehr zu klären.[3] Für Takenouchi Magohachi war es das erste Projekt als Verleger,[8] Tsuruya Kiemon war ein alteingesessenes Verlagshaus.[9] Nach Tsuruya Kiemons Ausscheiden, über dessen Gründe nichts bekannt ist, führte Takenouchi Magohachi das Projekt alleine fort.





Titel auf dem Vorsatzblatt, Vorwort und Inhaltsverzeichnis der ersten Gesamtausgabe

Die Drucke zeigen Szenen rund um die Stationen des Tōkaidō, der damals wichtigsten Überlandverbindung von Edo nach Kyōto, und deren umliegende Landschaften sowie zusätzlich den Startpunkt Nihonbashi in Edo und die Endstation bei Kyōto (damals auch Keishi genannt). Sie sind nicht in der Reihenfolge der Stationen entstanden; allenfalls orientierte sich die Reihenfolge der Entwürfe lose an der Abfolge der Raststationen.[Anm. 1]



Beim Publikum und den zeitgenössischen Kritikern fanden die Drucke großen Anklang[7] und wurden, nachdem alle Einzeldrucke erschienen waren, von Takenouchi Magohachi in zwei Bänden in Buchform herausgegeben. Der Titel auf dem Einband der Bücher lautete „Aufeinanderfolgende Bilder der 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“ (Shinkei Tōkaidō gojūsan eki tsuzukie, 真景東海道五十三駅続畫).[5] Der Serientitel auf den Drucken selbst blieb unverändert. Allerdings waren die Drucke in den beiden Bänden mittig vertikal gefaltet, da die Bücher im chūban-Format (halbes ōban-Format) erschienen. Viele der heute erhaltenen Drucke der Serie weisen diese Mittelfalte als Hinweis darauf aus, dass sie ursprünglich aus einem dieser Bücher stammen.[4] Heute ist kein vollständiges Exemplar der Erstauflage dieser Bücher mehr bekannt.[10]



Schätzungen zufolge wurden von einzelnen Blättern der Serie bis zu 25.000 Exemplare von den ersten Druckplatten gefertigt, bis diese nicht mehr zu gebrauchen waren.[11][4] Bereits im 19. Jahrhundert waren neue Platten geschnitten worden, um weitere Auflagen anzufertigen.[12] Im 20. Jahrhundert erfolgten weitere Neuauflagen[13] und selbst im 3. Jahrtausend werden noch immer Drucke dieser Serie als Farbholzschnitte und Reproduktionen verkauft.[14]



Ein größerer Teil der Drucke wurde nach der Erstveröffentlichung einer Überarbeitung unterzogen (Änderung der Farbpalette, Ausfüllen kleiner Fehlstellen, Weglassen einzelner Konturlinien etc.), so dass sie in zahlreichen unterschiedlichen Varianten erhalten sind. Ob diese Veränderungen auf Überlegungen Hiroshiges oder des Verlegers oder gar beider zurückzuführen ist, ist heute nicht mehr feststellbar. Gesichert ist, dass einige der Änderungen bereits nach der ersten Auflage erfolgt sein müssen, da einzelne Blätter im Zustand der Erstauflage extrem selten sind.[15] Von sechs Stationen wurde in der zweiten Hälfte der 1830er Jahre eine zweite Druckversion angefertigt, die möglicherweise verlorengegangene oder beschädigte Druckplatten ersetzten.[16] Diese neuen sind den vorhergehenden Versionen ähnlich, aber nicht mit ihnen identisch.[Anm. 2]



Der kommerzielle Erfolg der Serie Hiroshiges stand im engen Zusammenhang mit dem immens angewachsenen Reiseverkehr in Japan in den ersten Jahrzehnten des 19. Jahrhunderts, die eine Gesellschaft hervorgebracht hatten, die „süchtig nach Reisen und verrückt nach Souvenirs“ war.[17][18] Unmittelbarer Vorgänger von Hiroshiges Serie waren Katsushika Hokusais Drucke der „36 Ansichten des Berges Fuji“, die in ihrem Format und der Bildgestaltung, Darstellung von Menschen, eingebettet in eine sie umgebende Landschaft, Vorbildcharakter sowohl für Hiroshige als auch andere Landschaftsmaler seiner Zeit hatten.[19]



Mit seiner Serie traf Hiroshige jedoch noch mehr als Hokusai den Geschmack breiter Bevölkerungsschichten und setzte den Gedanken des Ukiyo als der „heiteren, vergänglichen Welt“ vollendet in den japanischen Landschaftsdruck um. Neu an Hiroshiges künstlerischer Landschaftsauffassung war nicht, dass er „lebendige Straßenszenen mit geschäftigen Menschen aus dem einfachen Volk (zum) Gegenstand der künstlerischen Auseinandersetzung“ machte.[20] Solche Genreszenen waren zuvor bereits unter anderem von Utagawa Toyohiro und Hokusai gezeichnet worden.[Anm. 3] Neu an Hiroshiges Bildern war die harmonische Eingliederung der Menschendarstellung in weitläufige Landschaften. Er gestaltete lyrische Bilder, in denen der Betrachter die Stimmung der Natur ungetrübt von philosophischem Nachsinnen über Natur und Mensch unmittelbar wahrnehmen konnte.[21] Die Drucke der Serie waren durchdrungen von expressiver poetischer Sensibilität.[7] Hiroshiges innovativer Stil und die Wahl des horizontalen ōban-Formats stellten einen neuen Schwerpunkt in der Auffassung des Tōkaidō dar und präsentierten eine neue Art des Landschaftsdruckes. Ihre andauernde Popularität und ihr Einfluss auf andere Künstler sind die Gründe für Hiroshiges Ruhm.[19]



Entstehungsgeschichte

Zur Entstehung der Serie hatte Hiroshige III., Schüler Hiroshiges I. und zweiter Ehemann von dessen Tochter, im Jahr 1894 kurz vor seinem Tod beiläufig in einem Zeitungsinterview geäußert, dass die Drucke der Serie auf Entwürfe zurückzuführen seien, die Hiroshige I. als Angehöriger einer offiziellen Delegation des Shōgun angefertigt habe.[10] Die Delegation habe im Jahr 1832 den Auftrag gehabt, ein Pferd als Geschenk des Shōgun Tokugawa Ienari von Edo an den Kaiserhof in Kyōto zu überbringen. Unterwegs habe Hiroshige seine Reiseeindrücke in Skizzen festgehalten und nach seiner Rückkehr nach Edo im 9. Monat des Jahres Tenpō 3 (entspricht in etwa dem September des Jahres 1832) dem Verleger Takenouchi Magohachi angeboten, die Skizzen als Vorlagen für eine Farbholzschnittserie umzuarbeiten.[22] Diese Geschichte übernahm zunächst Iijima Kyōshin in sein 1894 erschienenes Buch „Biografien der Ukiyo-e-Künstler der Utagawa-Schule“ (Utagawa retsuden, 浮世絵師歌川列伝).[23] Dann wurde sie 1930 von Minoru Uchida in dessen erste umfassende Biografie Hiroshiges[24] aufgenommen.[10] Von da an fand sie sich ungeprüft in der gesamten Literatur, die über Hiroshige erschienen ist. Zum Teil wurde sie soweit ausgeschmückt, dass Hiroshige möglicherweise sogar im Auftrag des Shōgun seine Skizzen angefertigt habe.[25]



Suzuki äußerte 1970 in seinem Buch „Hiroshige“[26] erste Zweifel an dieser Entstehungsgeschichte, indem er auf die Ähnlichkeit der Hiroshige-Drucke der Stationen Ishibe und Kanaya mit den entsprechenden Abbildungen im bereits 1797 erschienenen Tokaidō meisho zue hinwies.[10] Matthi Forrer griff 1997 diese Zweifel auf und wies auf die Unmöglichkeit hin, dass die Serie in 15 Monaten von Oktober 1832 bis zum Ende des Jahres 1834 fertiggestellt worden sein konnte.[22] Weitere Zweifel äußerte Timothy Clark 2004 und bezog sich dabei auf einen 1998 von Jun’ichi Okubo in Japan veröffentlichten Artikel. Clark hält die Geschichte von der Beteiligung Hiroshiges an einer offiziellen Delegation für einen Schwindel.[27] 2004 erschien die bislang umfassendste Monografie über Hiroshiges erste Tōkaidō-Serie von Jūzō Suzuki, Yaeko Kimura und Jun’ichi Okubo, Hiroshige Tōkaidō gojūsantsugi: Hoeidō-ban. Die Autoren wiesen darin nach, dass 26 der 55 Drucke der Serie auf zeitgenössische Vorlagen anderer Künstler zurückzuführen sind. Zudem sei eine Beteiligung von Hiroshige (bzw. Andō als seinem bürgerlichen Namen) an einer shōgunalen Delegation in den erhaltenen Akten nicht verzeichnet. Ebenso wenig ist eine solche Reise im noch zu Lebzeiten Hiroshiges erschienenen Ukiyo-e ruikō („Verschiedene Gedanken über Ukiyo-e“, 浮世絵類考), einer Art zeitgenössischen Who’s who der Farbholzschnittkünstler, erwähnt.[10] Dass die Drucke der Serie nicht auf eigene Skizzen Hiroshiges zurückzuführen seien, sondern auf Vorlagen zeitgenössischer Reiseführer, äußerte Andreas Marks im Zusammenhang mit seinen Beschreibungen der Verlegertätigkeit Takenouchi Magohachis in den Jahren 2008 und 2010.[28][8] Nachdem Marks für sein Buch Kunisada’s Tōkaidō weitere Bücher nachweisen konnte, aus denen Hiroshige Anregungen für die Gestaltung seiner Drucke entnommen hat, kommt er zu dem Ergebnis, dass die Geschichte von der Entstehung der Drucke als Reiseskizzen nicht länger aufrechtzuerhalten sei.[29]



Datierung

In Übereinstimmung mit der überlieferten Entstehungsgeschichte im Zusammenhang mit der im Dienste des Shōgun unternommenen Reise und der darin dokumentierten Rückkehr Hiroshiges nach Edo im September 1832 wird in der Literatur als Entstehungsjahr der ersten Drucke der Serie das Jahr 1832 angegeben. Das üblicherweise angegebene Datum für die Fertigstellung der Serie spätestens zum Jahresende 1833 folgt aus dem Vorwort des Autors Yomo no Takisui[30] (andere Lesung des Namens: Yomo Ryūsai[22]), das der ersten Gesamtausgabe vorangestellt und mit dem ersten Monat des Jahres Tenpō 5 (in etwa Januar 1834) datiert ist.





Kunisada, Station Kambara, aus der Serie „Die 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“, ca. 1835

Matthi Forrer geht davon aus, dass das Datum der Fertigstellung durch das Vorwort der Gesamtausgabe korrekt angegeben ist, äußert jedoch Zweifel, ob eine Serie von 55 ōban-Drucken innerhalb von nur 15 Monaten zwischen Oktober 1832 und Dezember 1833 hätte fertiggestellt werden können. Keine andere Farbholzschnittserie im ōban-Format hatte in Japan bis dahin einen solchen Umfang gehabt.[22] Der Verleger Takenouchi Magohachi war Sohn eines Pfandleihers und vor der Produktion der Hiroshige-Drucke nicht als Verleger in Erscheinung getreten.[28] Seine finanziellen Ressourcen bzw. seine Kreditwürdigkeit waren nicht ausreichend, das erforderliche Kapital für die Druckplatten, das Papier, die Farben und die Entlohnung für Holzschneider, Drucker und Künstler sowie die Kosten für einen Laden zum Verkauf der Drucke in so kurzer Zeit aufzubringen. Auch wenn zu Beginn der Produktion mit Tsuruya Kiemon ein alteingesessener Verleger beteiligt war, erscheint nach Forrer eine solch kurze Zeitspanne von 15 Monaten außergewöhnlich kurz. Er folgert daraus, dass sich die Fertigstellung der Drucke über einen längeren Zeitraum erstreckt haben müsse und somit die ersten Drucke im Jahr 1831 oder sogar bereits 1830 erschienen sein müssten.[22]



Jūzō Suzuki äußert darüber hinaus Zweifel am Datum der Fertigstellung der Serie zum Jahresende 1833. Ihm zufolge sei im Impressum der Gesamtausgabe als Adresse die Anschrift eines Ladens angegeben, den Takenouchi Magohachi nicht vor dem Neujahrstag 1836 eröffnet habe.[30]



Suzuki ist ebenfalls davon überzeugt, dass Kunisadas bijin-Serie Tōkaidō Tōkaidō gojūsan tsugi no uchi, bei deren Drucken der Hintergrund in 43 Fällen nach der Vorlage von Hiroshiges Serie gestaltet war, im Jahr 1833 begonnen und im Jahr 1835 vollendet worden war. Die Tatsache, dass 13 der Drucke von Kunisadas Serie einen Hintergrund haben, der von dem der Hiroshige-Drucke abweicht, interpretiert Suzuki so, dass Hiroshige seine Serie im Jahr 1835 noch nicht vollständig entworfen hatte. Kunisadas Verleger, Moriya Jihei und Sanoya Kihei, hätten jedoch darauf gedrängt, die Serie zu vollenden, und daher seien für die letzten, noch fehlenden Drucke Hintergründe aus dem Tokaidō meisho zue und ähnlichen Büchern ausgewählt worden.[30][31]



Yaeko Kimura war die erste, die wissenschaftliche Nachforschungen zur Biografie Takenouchi Magohachis anstellte und dabei unter anderem die verschiedenen von ihm verwendeten Verlegersiegel verglich. Ihrer Ansicht nach könne eine Gesamtausgabe von Hiroshiges Tōkaidō nicht vor dem Neujahrstag 1836 erfolgt sein.[30]



Da weitere Anhaltspunkte für die exakte Datierung der Drucke der Serie fehlen, kann ihre Entstehungszeit insgesamt nur ungefähr auf die erste Hälfte der 1830er Jahre eingegrenzt werden.



Bildgestaltung

Die Drucke sind im horizontalen (yoko-e) ōban-Format (ca. 39 × 26 cm) ausgeführt. Die bedruckte Fläche ist an allen vier Seiten mit einer dünnen schwarzen Linie von der unbedruckten Papierfläche abgegrenzt. Die Ecken sind nach innen abgerundet, so dass sich zusammen mit den jeweils ca. 1,5 cm breiten Rändern der Eindruck eines gerahmten Bildes ergibt. Bei vielen erhaltenen Drucken sind diese Ränder teilweise oder ganz bis auf den Druckrand beschnitten, wodurch der visuelle Eindruck der Drucke stark verändert wird.[4] Besonders auffällig ist dies bei den Drucken der Stationen Hara und Kakegawa, bei denen ein Bildelement den oberen Rahmen „durchbricht“ und bei denen das durch den Beschnitt verursachte Fehlen dieses Elements die Gesamtkomposition des Druckes zerstört.



Auf allen Drucken sind in irgendeiner Form Reisende auf der Tōkai-Straße dargestellt. Abgebildet sind sie in Verbindung mit Wegen, Flusslandschaften, Bergen, Seen und Meerespanoramen sowie Szenen an oder in Raststationen oder Tempeln. Manchmal sind die Reisenden nur winzig klein in Gruppen als Staffage in der Landschaft zu sehen, manchmal sind sie gestalterisches Element der Drucke und mit individuellen Zügen gezeichnet. Die Drucke folgen keinem Programm, außer dem der Darstellung von Reisenden in unterschiedlichen Szenarien. Die auf den Drucken dargestellten Szenen zeigen keine bestimmte Jahreszeit, stattdessen wechseln sich die jahreszeitlichen Impressionen unsystematisch ab; abgebildet sind Szenen aus allen vier Jahreszeiten, mit Sonne, Regen oder Schneefall. Ebenso unterschiedlich und unsystematisch sind die in den Drucken zu erkennenden Tageszeiten: Zu sehen sind Szenen mit Sonnenauf- und -untergang sowie Szenen, die sich im Tagesverlauf oder im Einzelfall auch nachts abspielen.



An einer freien Stelle innerhalb der Bildkomposition befindet sich der Serientitel „Tōkaido gojūsan tsuki no uchi“. Die kanji des Titels sind in zwei bzw. drei Spalten geschrieben. In jeweils einem Fall ist der Titel in einer Spalte (Station Okabe) bzw. einer Zeile (Station Fuchū) geschrieben. Links vom Serientitel befindet sich leicht abgesetzt der Name der jeweiligen Station und wiederum davon links der Untertitel des jeweiligen Druckes; in einigen wenigen Fällen findet sich der Untertitel direkt unterhalb des Stationsnamens. Serientitel und Stationsnamen sind in Schwarz gedruckt; die Untertitel befinden sich in einer roten Kartusche, die in Negativ- oder Positivdruck ausgeführt ist.



Vom Serientitel abgesetzt, in vielen Fällen auf der gegenüberliegenden Seite des Blattes, ist die Signatur Hiroshiges (Hiroshige ga, 廣重画) in schwarzen kanji gedruckt. Unterhalb der Künstlersignatur findet sich ein rotes Verlegersiegel in unterschiedlichen Formen. Bei der zweiten Version des Druckes der Station Odawara findet sich ein zusätzliches rotes Verlegersiegel rechts oberhalb des Serientitels.



Das Zensursiegel kiwame (極 für ‚geprüft‘) befand sich ursprünglich bei allen Drucken auf dem linken unteren Randbereich der Blätter. Bei den ersten drei Stationen, Nihonbashi, Shinagawa und Kawasaki, sowie der Station Totsuka wurde nach der Überarbeitung der Bildkomposition das ursprüngliche gemeinsame Siegel der Verleger Senkakudō und Hoeidō durch ein kalebassenförmiges Siegel Hoeidōs mit einem integrierten Zensursiegel ersetzt und somit das kiwame-Siegel am linken Rand überflüssig. Auf den zweiten Versionen der Drucke der Stationen Kanagawa und Odawara ist das kiwame-Siegel ebenfalls vom linken Rand entfernt und durch ein Verlegersiegel mit integriertem kiwame-Siegel ersetzt worden.
1855
Artists
Utagawa (Ando) Hiroshige
Farbholzschnitt auf Japan
CHF 2,800.00
Edition
Unbekannt
Signature
Unsigniert, Verleger Tsutaya Kichizo, Zensur: Avatame
35.7 x 24.2 cm
Enquiry
Shitaya Hirokoji 下谷 広小路 ,
Description
Veröffentlichung

Hiroshige war um 1830 ein weitgehend unbekannter Künstler, der bis dahin nur wenige Aufträge für den Entwurf von Farbholzschnitten erhalten hatte. Um 1830 übertrug ihm der Verleger Kawaguchiya Shōzō den Auftrag, eine Serie von großformatigen Drucken (das heißt Drucke im ōban-Format) von Ansichten bekannter Orte in Edo zu gestalten („Berühmte Ansichten der Osthauptstadt“, Tōto meisho, 東都名所). Die Serie war kein überragender Erfolg, erlebte jedoch bereits mehrere Auflagen, wie unterschiedliche Druckzustände belegen.[6] Die Serie, die Hiroshige als Künstler der Landschaftsdrucke (fūkeiga, 風景画) bekannt machte, war die Serie dem Titel „Die 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“ (Tōkaidō gojūsan tsugi no uchi).[7]



Zu Beginn der 1830er Jahre erschienen die ersten Drucke dieser Serie und waren ebenso wie die vorhergehende Serie im ōban-Querformat angelegt. Gemeinsame Verleger der ersten elf Drucke waren Tsuruya Kiemon und Takenouchi Magohachi, der Druck der Station Okabe wurde alleine von Tsuruya Kiemon herausgegeben und die weiteren 43 Drucke produzierte Takenouchi Magohachi alleine. Wer die Idee für dieses Projekt hatte und wer wen zuerst angesprochen hat, ist nicht mehr zu klären.[3] Für Takenouchi Magohachi war es das erste Projekt als Verleger,[8] Tsuruya Kiemon war ein alteingesessenes Verlagshaus.[9] Nach Tsuruya Kiemons Ausscheiden, über dessen Gründe nichts bekannt ist, führte Takenouchi Magohachi das Projekt alleine fort.





Titel auf dem Vorsatzblatt, Vorwort und Inhaltsverzeichnis der ersten Gesamtausgabe

Die Drucke zeigen Szenen rund um die Stationen des Tōkaidō, der damals wichtigsten Überlandverbindung von Edo nach Kyōto, und deren umliegende Landschaften sowie zusätzlich den Startpunkt Nihonbashi in Edo und die Endstation bei Kyōto (damals auch Keishi genannt). Sie sind nicht in der Reihenfolge der Stationen entstanden; allenfalls orientierte sich die Reihenfolge der Entwürfe lose an der Abfolge der Raststationen.[Anm. 1]



Beim Publikum und den zeitgenössischen Kritikern fanden die Drucke großen Anklang[7] und wurden, nachdem alle Einzeldrucke erschienen waren, von Takenouchi Magohachi in zwei Bänden in Buchform herausgegeben. Der Titel auf dem Einband der Bücher lautete „Aufeinanderfolgende Bilder der 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“ (Shinkei Tōkaidō gojūsan eki tsuzukie, 真景東海道五十三駅続畫).[5] Der Serientitel auf den Drucken selbst blieb unverändert. Allerdings waren die Drucke in den beiden Bänden mittig vertikal gefaltet, da die Bücher im chūban-Format (halbes ōban-Format) erschienen. Viele der heute erhaltenen Drucke der Serie weisen diese Mittelfalte als Hinweis darauf aus, dass sie ursprünglich aus einem dieser Bücher stammen.[4] Heute ist kein vollständiges Exemplar der Erstauflage dieser Bücher mehr bekannt.[10]



Schätzungen zufolge wurden von einzelnen Blättern der Serie bis zu 25.000 Exemplare von den ersten Druckplatten gefertigt, bis diese nicht mehr zu gebrauchen waren.[11][4] Bereits im 19. Jahrhundert waren neue Platten geschnitten worden, um weitere Auflagen anzufertigen.[12] Im 20. Jahrhundert erfolgten weitere Neuauflagen[13] und selbst im 3. Jahrtausend werden noch immer Drucke dieser Serie als Farbholzschnitte und Reproduktionen verkauft.[14]



Ein größerer Teil der Drucke wurde nach der Erstveröffentlichung einer Überarbeitung unterzogen (Änderung der Farbpalette, Ausfüllen kleiner Fehlstellen, Weglassen einzelner Konturlinien etc.), so dass sie in zahlreichen unterschiedlichen Varianten erhalten sind. Ob diese Veränderungen auf Überlegungen Hiroshiges oder des Verlegers oder gar beider zurückzuführen ist, ist heute nicht mehr feststellbar. Gesichert ist, dass einige der Änderungen bereits nach der ersten Auflage erfolgt sein müssen, da einzelne Blätter im Zustand der Erstauflage extrem selten sind.[15] Von sechs Stationen wurde in der zweiten Hälfte der 1830er Jahre eine zweite Druckversion angefertigt, die möglicherweise verlorengegangene oder beschädigte Druckplatten ersetzten.[16] Diese neuen sind den vorhergehenden Versionen ähnlich, aber nicht mit ihnen identisch.[Anm. 2]



Der kommerzielle Erfolg der Serie Hiroshiges stand im engen Zusammenhang mit dem immens angewachsenen Reiseverkehr in Japan in den ersten Jahrzehnten des 19. Jahrhunderts, die eine Gesellschaft hervorgebracht hatten, die „süchtig nach Reisen und verrückt nach Souvenirs“ war.[17][18] Unmittelbarer Vorgänger von Hiroshiges Serie waren Katsushika Hokusais Drucke der „36 Ansichten des Berges Fuji“, die in ihrem Format und der Bildgestaltung, Darstellung von Menschen, eingebettet in eine sie umgebende Landschaft, Vorbildcharakter sowohl für Hiroshige als auch andere Landschaftsmaler seiner Zeit hatten.[19]



Mit seiner Serie traf Hiroshige jedoch noch mehr als Hokusai den Geschmack breiter Bevölkerungsschichten und setzte den Gedanken des Ukiyo als der „heiteren, vergänglichen Welt“ vollendet in den japanischen Landschaftsdruck um. Neu an Hiroshiges künstlerischer Landschaftsauffassung war nicht, dass er „lebendige Straßenszenen mit geschäftigen Menschen aus dem einfachen Volk (zum) Gegenstand der künstlerischen Auseinandersetzung“ machte.[20] Solche Genreszenen waren zuvor bereits unter anderem von Utagawa Toyohiro und Hokusai gezeichnet worden.[Anm. 3] Neu an Hiroshiges Bildern war die harmonische Eingliederung der Menschendarstellung in weitläufige Landschaften. Er gestaltete lyrische Bilder, in denen der Betrachter die Stimmung der Natur ungetrübt von philosophischem Nachsinnen über Natur und Mensch unmittelbar wahrnehmen konnte.[21] Die Drucke der Serie waren durchdrungen von expressiver poetischer Sensibilität.[7] Hiroshiges innovativer Stil und die Wahl des horizontalen ōban-Formats stellten einen neuen Schwerpunkt in der Auffassung des Tōkaidō dar und präsentierten eine neue Art des Landschaftsdruckes. Ihre andauernde Popularität und ihr Einfluss auf andere Künstler sind die Gründe für Hiroshiges Ruhm.[19]



Entstehungsgeschichte

Zur Entstehung der Serie hatte Hiroshige III., Schüler Hiroshiges I. und zweiter Ehemann von dessen Tochter, im Jahr 1894 kurz vor seinem Tod beiläufig in einem Zeitungsinterview geäußert, dass die Drucke der Serie auf Entwürfe zurückzuführen seien, die Hiroshige I. als Angehöriger einer offiziellen Delegation des Shōgun angefertigt habe.[10] Die Delegation habe im Jahr 1832 den Auftrag gehabt, ein Pferd als Geschenk des Shōgun Tokugawa Ienari von Edo an den Kaiserhof in Kyōto zu überbringen. Unterwegs habe Hiroshige seine Reiseeindrücke in Skizzen festgehalten und nach seiner Rückkehr nach Edo im 9. Monat des Jahres Tenpō 3 (entspricht in etwa dem September des Jahres 1832) dem Verleger Takenouchi Magohachi angeboten, die Skizzen als Vorlagen für eine Farbholzschnittserie umzuarbeiten.[22] Diese Geschichte übernahm zunächst Iijima Kyōshin in sein 1894 erschienenes Buch „Biografien der Ukiyo-e-Künstler der Utagawa-Schule“ (Utagawa retsuden, 浮世絵師歌川列伝).[23] Dann wurde sie 1930 von Minoru Uchida in dessen erste umfassende Biografie Hiroshiges[24] aufgenommen.[10] Von da an fand sie sich ungeprüft in der gesamten Literatur, die über Hiroshige erschienen ist. Zum Teil wurde sie soweit ausgeschmückt, dass Hiroshige möglicherweise sogar im Auftrag des Shōgun seine Skizzen angefertigt habe.[25]



Suzuki äußerte 1970 in seinem Buch „Hiroshige“[26] erste Zweifel an dieser Entstehungsgeschichte, indem er auf die Ähnlichkeit der Hiroshige-Drucke der Stationen Ishibe und Kanaya mit den entsprechenden Abbildungen im bereits 1797 erschienenen Tokaidō meisho zue hinwies.[10] Matthi Forrer griff 1997 diese Zweifel auf und wies auf die Unmöglichkeit hin, dass die Serie in 15 Monaten von Oktober 1832 bis zum Ende des Jahres 1834 fertiggestellt worden sein konnte.[22] Weitere Zweifel äußerte Timothy Clark 2004 und bezog sich dabei auf einen 1998 von Jun’ichi Okubo in Japan veröffentlichten Artikel. Clark hält die Geschichte von der Beteiligung Hiroshiges an einer offiziellen Delegation für einen Schwindel.[27] 2004 erschien die bislang umfassendste Monografie über Hiroshiges erste Tōkaidō-Serie von Jūzō Suzuki, Yaeko Kimura und Jun’ichi Okubo, Hiroshige Tōkaidō gojūsantsugi: Hoeidō-ban. Die Autoren wiesen darin nach, dass 26 der 55 Drucke der Serie auf zeitgenössische Vorlagen anderer Künstler zurückzuführen sind. Zudem sei eine Beteiligung von Hiroshige (bzw. Andō als seinem bürgerlichen Namen) an einer shōgunalen Delegation in den erhaltenen Akten nicht verzeichnet. Ebenso wenig ist eine solche Reise im noch zu Lebzeiten Hiroshiges erschienenen Ukiyo-e ruikō („Verschiedene Gedanken über Ukiyo-e“, 浮世絵類考), einer Art zeitgenössischen Who’s who der Farbholzschnittkünstler, erwähnt.[10] Dass die Drucke der Serie nicht auf eigene Skizzen Hiroshiges zurückzuführen seien, sondern auf Vorlagen zeitgenössischer Reiseführer, äußerte Andreas Marks im Zusammenhang mit seinen Beschreibungen der Verlegertätigkeit Takenouchi Magohachis in den Jahren 2008 und 2010.[28][8] Nachdem Marks für sein Buch Kunisada’s Tōkaidō weitere Bücher nachweisen konnte, aus denen Hiroshige Anregungen für die Gestaltung seiner Drucke entnommen hat, kommt er zu dem Ergebnis, dass die Geschichte von der Entstehung der Drucke als Reiseskizzen nicht länger aufrechtzuerhalten sei.[29]



Datierung

In Übereinstimmung mit der überlieferten Entstehungsgeschichte im Zusammenhang mit der im Dienste des Shōgun unternommenen Reise und der darin dokumentierten Rückkehr Hiroshiges nach Edo im September 1832 wird in der Literatur als Entstehungsjahr der ersten Drucke der Serie das Jahr 1832 angegeben. Das üblicherweise angegebene Datum für die Fertigstellung der Serie spätestens zum Jahresende 1833 folgt aus dem Vorwort des Autors Yomo no Takisui[30] (andere Lesung des Namens: Yomo Ryūsai[22]), das der ersten Gesamtausgabe vorangestellt und mit dem ersten Monat des Jahres Tenpō 5 (in etwa Januar 1834) datiert ist.





Kunisada, Station Kambara, aus der Serie „Die 53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“, ca. 1835

Matthi Forrer geht davon aus, dass das Datum der Fertigstellung durch das Vorwort der Gesamtausgabe korrekt angegeben ist, äußert jedoch Zweifel, ob eine Serie von 55 ōban-Drucken innerhalb von nur 15 Monaten zwischen Oktober 1832 und Dezember 1833 hätte fertiggestellt werden können. Keine andere Farbholzschnittserie im ōban-Format hatte in Japan bis dahin einen solchen Umfang gehabt.[22] Der Verleger Takenouchi Magohachi war Sohn eines Pfandleihers und vor der Produktion der Hiroshige-Drucke nicht als Verleger in Erscheinung getreten.[28] Seine finanziellen Ressourcen bzw. seine Kreditwürdigkeit waren nicht ausreichend, das erforderliche Kapital für die Druckplatten, das Papier, die Farben und die Entlohnung für Holzschneider, Drucker und Künstler sowie die Kosten für einen Laden zum Verkauf der Drucke in so kurzer Zeit aufzubringen. Auch wenn zu Beginn der Produktion mit Tsuruya Kiemon ein alteingesessener Verleger beteiligt war, erscheint nach Forrer eine solch kurze Zeitspanne von 15 Monaten außergewöhnlich kurz. Er folgert daraus, dass sich die Fertigstellung der Drucke über einen längeren Zeitraum erstreckt haben müsse und somit die ersten Drucke im Jahr 1831 oder sogar bereits 1830 erschienen sein müssten.[22]



Jūzō Suzuki äußert darüber hinaus Zweifel am Datum der Fertigstellung der Serie zum Jahresende 1833. Ihm zufolge sei im Impressum der Gesamtausgabe als Adresse die Anschrift eines Ladens angegeben, den Takenouchi Magohachi nicht vor dem Neujahrstag 1836 eröffnet habe.[30]



Suzuki ist ebenfalls davon überzeugt, dass Kunisadas bijin-Serie Tōkaidō Tōkaidō gojūsan tsugi no uchi, bei deren Drucken der Hintergrund in 43 Fällen nach der Vorlage von Hiroshiges Serie gestaltet war, im Jahr 1833 begonnen und im Jahr 1835 vollendet worden war. Die Tatsache, dass 13 der Drucke von Kunisadas Serie einen Hintergrund haben, der von dem der Hiroshige-Drucke abweicht, interpretiert Suzuki so, dass Hiroshige seine Serie im Jahr 1835 noch nicht vollständig entworfen hatte. Kunisadas Verleger, Moriya Jihei und Sanoya Kihei, hätten jedoch darauf gedrängt, die Serie zu vollenden, und daher seien für die letzten, noch fehlenden Drucke Hintergründe aus dem Tokaidō meisho zue und ähnlichen Büchern ausgewählt worden.[30][31]



Yaeko Kimura war die erste, die wissenschaftliche Nachforschungen zur Biografie Takenouchi Magohachis anstellte und dabei unter anderem die verschiedenen von ihm verwendeten Verlegersiegel verglich. Ihrer Ansicht nach könne eine Gesamtausgabe von Hiroshiges Tōkaidō nicht vor dem Neujahrstag 1836 erfolgt sein.[30]



Da weitere Anhaltspunkte für die exakte Datierung der Drucke der Serie fehlen, kann ihre Entstehungszeit insgesamt nur ungefähr auf die erste Hälfte der 1830er Jahre eingegrenzt werden.



Bildgestaltung

Die Drucke sind im horizontalen (yoko-e) ōban-Format (ca. 39 × 26 cm) ausgeführt. Die bedruckte Fläche ist an allen vier Seiten mit einer dünnen schwarzen Linie von der unbedruckten Papierfläche abgegrenzt. Die Ecken sind nach innen abgerundet, so dass sich zusammen mit den jeweils ca. 1,5 cm breiten Rändern der Eindruck eines gerahmten Bildes ergibt. Bei vielen erhaltenen Drucken sind diese Ränder teilweise oder ganz bis auf den Druckrand beschnitten, wodurch der visuelle Eindruck der Drucke stark verändert wird.[4] Besonders auffällig ist dies bei den Drucken der Stationen Hara und Kakegawa, bei denen ein Bildelement den oberen Rahmen „durchbricht“ und bei denen das durch den Beschnitt verursachte Fehlen dieses Elements die Gesamtkomposition des Druckes zerstört.



Auf allen Drucken sind in irgendeiner Form Reisende auf der Tōkai-Straße dargestellt. Abgebildet sind sie in Verbindung mit Wegen, Flusslandschaften, Bergen, Seen und Meerespanoramen sowie Szenen an oder in Raststationen oder Tempeln. Manchmal sind die Reisenden nur winzig klein in Gruppen als Staffage in der Landschaft zu sehen, manchmal sind sie gestalterisches Element der Drucke und mit individuellen Zügen gezeichnet. Die Drucke folgen keinem Programm, außer dem der Darstellung von Reisenden in unterschiedlichen Szenarien. Die auf den Drucken dargestellten Szenen zeigen keine bestimmte Jahreszeit, stattdessen wechseln sich die jahreszeitlichen Impressionen unsystematisch ab; abgebildet sind Szenen aus allen vier Jahreszeiten, mit Sonne, Regen oder Schneefall. Ebenso unterschiedlich und unsystematisch sind die in den Drucken zu erkennenden Tageszeiten: Zu sehen sind Szenen mit Sonnenauf- und -untergang sowie Szenen, die sich im Tagesverlauf oder im Einzelfall auch nachts abspielen.



An einer freien Stelle innerhalb der Bildkomposition befindet sich der Serientitel „Tōkaido gojūsan tsuki no uchi“. Die kanji des Titels sind in zwei bzw. drei Spalten geschrieben. In jeweils einem Fall ist der Titel in einer Spalte (Station Okabe) bzw. einer Zeile (Station Fuchū) geschrieben. Links vom Serientitel befindet sich leicht abgesetzt der Name der jeweiligen Station und wiederum davon links der Untertitel des jeweiligen Druckes; in einigen wenigen Fällen findet sich der Untertitel direkt unterhalb des Stationsnamens. Serientitel und Stationsnamen sind in Schwarz gedruckt; die Untertitel befinden sich in einer roten Kartusche, die in Negativ- oder Positivdruck ausgeführt ist.



Vom Serientitel abgesetzt, in vielen Fällen auf der gegenüberliegenden Seite des Blattes, ist die Signatur Hiroshiges (Hiroshige ga, 廣重画) in schwarzen kanji gedruckt. Unterhalb der Künstlersignatur findet sich ein rotes Verlegersiegel in unterschiedlichen Formen. Bei der zweiten Version des Druckes der Station Odawara findet sich ein zusätzliches rotes Verlegersiegel rechts oberhalb des Serientitels.



Das Zensursiegel kiwame (極 für ‚geprüft‘) befand sich ursprünglich bei allen Drucken auf dem linken unteren Randbereich der Blätter. Bei den ersten drei Stationen, Nihonbashi, Shinagawa und Kawasaki, sowie der Station Totsuka wurde nach der Überarbeitung der Bildkomposition das ursprüngliche gemeinsame Siegel der Verleger Senkakudō und Hoeidō durch ein kalebassenförmiges Siegel Hoeidōs mit einem integrierten Zensursiegel ersetzt und somit das kiwame-Siegel am linken Rand überflüssig. Auf den zweiten Versionen der Drucke der Stationen Kanagawa und Odawara ist das kiwame-Siegel ebenfalls vom linken Rand entfernt und durch ein Verlegersiegel mit integriertem kiwame-Siegel ersetzt worden.
1856
Artists
Utagawa (Ando) Hiroshige
Farbholzschnitt auf Japan
CHF 2,800.00
Edition
Unbekannt
Signature
Unsigniert, Draper's shop Ito-Matsuzakaya. No 13 in series. 1 of 2 impressions.
35.7 x 24.2 cm
Enquiry
Ohne Titel (Cabaret)
1989 - 1989
Artists
Karl Horst Hödicke
Tempera auf Papier
CHF 14,000.00
Signature
unten rechts in Bleistift signiert und datiert
63.2 x 90.8 cm
Enquiry
Junge Frau in Landschaft (Girl in Landscape), Dyptichon
Description
The Hokusai Manga (北斎漫画, "Hokusai's Sketches") is a collection of sketches of various subjects by the Japanese artist Hokusai. Subjects of the sketches include landscapes, flora and fauna, everyday life and the supernatural.



The word manga in the title does not refer to the contemporary story-telling manga, as the sketches in the work are not connected to each other. While manga has come to mean "comics" in modern Japanese, the word was used in the Edo period to mean informal drawings, possibly preparatory sketches for paintings.



Block-printed in three colours (black, gray and pale flesh), the Hokusai Manga comprises thousands of images in ten volumes from 1814 to 1819, with five volumes added in 1834 to 1878. The first volume was published in 1814, when the artist was 55.



The final three volumes were published posthumously, two of them assembled by their publisher from previously unpublished material. The final volume was made up of previously published works, some not even by Hokusai, and is not considered authentic by art historians.



Publication history

The preface to the first volume of the work, written by Hanshū Sanjin (半洲散人), a minor artist of Nagoya, suggests that the publication of the work may have been aided by Hokusai's pupils. Part of the preface reads:



This autumn the master [Hokusai] happened to visit the Western Province and stopped over at our city [Nagoya]. We all met together with the painter Gekkōtei Bokusen (月光亭墨僊) [Utamasa II, well-known Nagoya artist, pupil of Hokusai’s, and collator of Hokusai’s later work] at the latter’s residence, it being a very joyous occasion. And there over three hundred sketches of all kinds were made – from immortals, Buddhas, scholars, and women on down to birds, beasts, grasses, and trees, the spirit of each captured fully by the brush.



The final volume is considered spurious by some art historians.



The initial publication is usually credited to Eirakuya Toshiro (永楽屋東四郎) of Nagoya whose publishing house was renamed to Eito Shoten in 1914.



Sources of the Manga

Hokusai Manga depicting self-defense techniques (early 19th century)

The traditional view holds that, after the outburst of production, Hokusai carefully selected and redrew the sketches, arranging them into the patterns we see today. However, Michener (1958:30-34) argues that the pattern of the images on a particular plate were arranged by the wood carvers and publishers, not by the artist himself.



Legacy

The first volume of 'Manga' (Defined by Hokusai as 'Brush gone wild'), was an art instruction book published to aid his troubled finances. Shortly after he removed the text and republished it. The Manga show a dedication to artistic realism in the portrayal of people and the natural world. The work was an immediate success, and the subsequent volumes soon followed. The work became known to the West after Dutch-employed German physicist Philipp Franz von Siebold took lithographs of some of the sketches to Europe where they appeared in his influential book on Japan, Nippon: Archiv Zur Beschreibung von Japon in 1832. The work began to circulate in the West soon after Matthew C. Perry's entry into Japan in 1854.



Katsushika Hokusai took the name Hokusai around 1798, when he was about 39 years old. This name is derived from two words: "Hoku", which means "north", and "sai", which refers to a meal offered to the Buddha. This name changes coincided with an important transitional phase in his artistic career, which was characterised by the search for his own style and the exploration of different techniques and artistic influences. Under this new name, Hokusai became one of Japan's most famous artists and produced some of his best-known works, including the series "Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji".



Katsushika Hokusai took the name Hokusai around 1798, when he was about 39 years old. This name is derived from two words: "Hoku", which means "north", and "sai", which refers to a meal offered to the Buddha. This name changes coincided with an important transitional phase in his artistic career, which was characterised by the search for his own style and the exploration of different techniques and artistic influences. Under this new name, Hokusai became one of Japan's most famous artists and produced some of his best-known works, including the series "Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji".



Quote: "At 73, I have roughly understood the structure of real nature, animals, grasses, trees, birds, fish and insects. Therefore, at 80, I will have made even more progress; at 90, I will penetrate the mystery of things; at 100, I will surely have become marvellous, and at 110, every point, every line will have a life of its own."
1814 - 1878
Artists
Katsushika Hokusai
Farbholzschnitt von drei Platten auf dünnem Japan - coulour woodcut from three plates on thin Japan
CHF 620.00
Edition
14/162
Signature
unsigniert
19 x 25,5 cm (2 x 19 x 12.7)
Enquiry
Schlachtenszene mit Samurai und Geist (Battlescene with Samurai and Ghost), Dyptichon
Description
The Hokusai Manga (北斎漫画, "Hokusai's Sketches") is a collection of sketches of various subjects by the Japanese artist Hokusai. Subjects of the sketches include landscapes, flora and fauna, everyday life and the supernatural.



The word manga in the title does not refer to the contemporary story-telling manga, as the sketches in the work are not connected to each other. While manga has come to mean "comics" in modern Japanese, the word was used in the Edo period to mean informal drawings, possibly preparatory sketches for paintings.



Block-printed in three colours (black, gray and pale flesh), the Hokusai Manga comprises thousands of images in ten volumes from 1814 to 1819, with five volumes added in 1834 to 1878. The first volume was published in 1814, when the artist was 55.



The final three volumes were published posthumously, two of them assembled by their publisher from previously unpublished material. The final volume was made up of previously published works, some not even by Hokusai, and is not considered authentic by art historians.



Publication history

The preface to the first volume of the work, written by Hanshū Sanjin (半洲散人), a minor artist of Nagoya, suggests that the publication of the work may have been aided by Hokusai's pupils. Part of the preface reads:



This autumn the master [Hokusai] happened to visit the Western Province and stopped over at our city [Nagoya]. We all met together with the painter Gekkōtei Bokusen (月光亭墨僊) [Utamasa II, well-known Nagoya artist, pupil of Hokusai’s, and collator of Hokusai’s later work] at the latter’s residence, it being a very joyous occasion. And there over three hundred sketches of all kinds were made – from immortals, Buddhas, scholars, and women on down to birds, beasts, grasses, and trees, the spirit of each captured fully by the brush.



The final volume is considered spurious by some art historians.



The initial publication is usually credited to Eirakuya Toshiro (永楽屋東四郎) of Nagoya whose publishing house was renamed to Eito Shoten in 1914.



Sources of the Manga

Hokusai Manga depicting self-defense techniques (early 19th century)

The traditional view holds that, after the outburst of production, Hokusai carefully selected and redrew the sketches, arranging them into the patterns we see today. However, Michener (1958:30-34) argues that the pattern of the images on a particular plate were arranged by the wood carvers and publishers, not by the artist himself.



Legacy

The first volume of 'Manga' (Defined by Hokusai as 'Brush gone wild'), was an art instruction book published to aid his troubled finances. Shortly after he removed the text and republished it. The Manga show a dedication to artistic realism in the portrayal of people and the natural world. The work was an immediate success, and the subsequent volumes soon followed. The work became known to the West after Dutch-employed German physicist Philipp Franz von Siebold took lithographs of some of the sketches to Europe where they appeared in his influential book on Japan, Nippon: Archiv Zur Beschreibung von Japon in 1832. The work began to circulate in the West soon after Matthew C. Perry's entry into Japan in 1854.



Katsushika Hokusai took the name Hokusai around 1798, when he was about 39 years old. This name is derived from two words: "Hoku", which means "north", and "sai", which refers to a meal offered to the Buddha. This name changes coincided with an important transitional phase in his artistic career, which was characterised by the search for his own style and the exploration of different techniques and artistic influences. Under this new name, Hokusai became one of Japan's most famous artists and produced some of his best-known works, including the series "Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji".



Katsushika Hokusai took the name Hokusai around 1798, when he was about 39 years old. This name is derived from two words: "Hoku", which means "north", and "sai", which refers to a meal offered to the Buddha. This name changes coincided with an important transitional phase in his artistic career, which was characterised by the search for his own style and the exploration of different techniques and artistic influences. Under this new name, Hokusai became one of Japan's most famous artists and produced some of his best-known works, including the series "Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji".



Quote: "At 73, I have roughly understood the structure of real nature, animals, grasses, trees, birds, fish and insects. Therefore, at 80, I will have made even more progress; at 90, I will penetrate the mystery of things; at 100, I will surely have become marvellous, and at 110, every point, every line will have a life of its own."
1810 - 1820
Artists
Katsushika Hokusai
Farbholzschnitt von drei Platten auf dünnem Japan - coulour woodcut from three plates on thin Japan
CHF 950.00
Edition
8/162
Signature
unsigniert
19,6 x 26,6 cm (2 x 19,6 x 13,3)
Enquiry